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2016 WINNERS

AGRICULTURE PHOTO OF THE YEAR

"BETWEEN HERONS AND FARMING"
ERWIN M. MASCARIÑAS
SUNSTAR CAGAYAN DE ORO

TOBACCO PHOTO OF THE YEAR

"A FARMER"
ERWIN BELEO
TEMPO
AGRICULTURE STORY OF THE YEAR
“AGING FARMERS”
JUJEMAY AWIT
SUN.STAR CEBU
This two-part series talks about how farmers in the Philippines are getting older and older each year while the younger generation is turning its back on this industry and how the Department of Agriculture, Department of Education and local schools are making the effort to make farming a viable, profitable and sustainable option for young Filipinos.
FULL STORY
TOBACCO STORY OF THE YEAR
“SO WHAT IS HOLDING UP THE COMMERCIALIZATION OF TOBACCO BY-PRODUCTS?”
IAN OCAMPO FLORA
SUN.STAR PAMPANGA
This article discusses the various by-products that can be derived from tobacco. The tobacco stalk is a good source of pulp for paper. Tobacco scrap can be used as an effective pesticide. Tobacco dust can be used in aquaculture. These by-products can provide additional income not only to the farmers but could also create new and profitable industries. The National Tobacco Administration and several private entities have already done extensive research on these by-products but still need additional support from the government and investment from the private sector.
FULL STORY
2016 TOBACCO STORY OF THE YEAR AWARD
“SO WHAT IS HOLDING UP THE COMMERCIALIZATION OF TOBACCO BY-PRODUCTS?”
IAN OCAMPO FLORA
Sun.Star Pampanga


CITY OF SAN FERNANDO Tobacco stalk, the most common agricultural waste that tobacco farmers have been discarding for centuries since commercial tobacco farming was introduced in the islands during the dawn of the tobacco monopoly, is in fact a diamond in the rough.



Tobacco stalk has been found to be a good source of pulp for the production of paper. Tobacco paper processing impacts less on the environment and has the potential to penetrate the country's P30 billion paper industry if given a chance.

However, tobacco paper production remains a handicraft and hand-made industry.

Tobacco scrap has been found to be an effective mollouscide, meaning it is a cheap alternative in controlling farm snails that eat palay at the start of the cropping season. One research has also shown that tobacco scarp can be used as alternative organic soil conditioner.



However, tobacco scrap has yet to be processed commercially.



Tobacco dust has also been proven by research done by the National Tobacco Administration (NTA) as a boost to local aquaculture and can even jumpstart initiatives for more organic aquaculture programs.



However, tobacco dust has yet to be fully developed for wider use.



So what is keeping these wonderful prospects from reaching full potential?



Local initiatives



In 1998, a research done by Agrupis, S., Maekawa, E. and Suzuki, K. J on the possible industrial utilization of tobacco stalks revealed that tobacco stalks have shown to posses the characteristics of a raw material for pulp and paper application.

"Fiber dimensions, chemical composition, and soda and soda-AQ pulping of tobacco stalks were examined to assess if they were suitable for pulp and paper production. The results showed that the morphological characteristics of tobacco stalks were similar to those of non-woods and hardwoods," the research said.



Author Jed Yabut said that the pulp and paper industry contributes about P30 billion per year in domestic sales value to the economy, or saves the country $700 million per year in foreign exchange from imported paper and board.



He added that as of 2012 the local paper industry directly employs about 6000, personnel, mostly skilled workers and technical professionals, and contribute value to the economy by sustaining the livelihood opportunities of about 1.2 million workers in the wastepaper collection, sorting, and hauling sub-sectors.

If pulp from tobacco stalk would transcend its current state as a handicraft product in can very well contribute in the wider paper market.



Currently, paper produced from tobacco is hand-made using processes of bio-mechanical pulping and non-conventional bleaching, which produce less impact on the environment. NTA is the only known supplier of tobacco hand-made paper as of press time. The NTA, in the past years, have trained farmer-leaders from four tobacco-based cooperatives from Pangasinan, Ilocos Norte and Ilocos Sur. The idea is to help farmers earn more through creating cottage industries.



Hand-made tobacco paper is mainly used for all-purpose cards, stationeries, invitations, gift wrappers, bags among others.



But imagine if tobacco paper is industrialized further. Around 156 kg of tobacco stalks would yield 60 kg of pulp, this means almost 0.3 cubic metres of wood could be saved from forests from being converted to paper.



Though more research is needed on whether tobacco paper can compete in the commercial paper industry on an industrialized level, the prospects still are too tempting to ignore.



Impact on local industries



A research of James, et al. from PhilRice-Batac demonstrated the use of tobacco scrap before and after transplanting to control harmful snail populations in rice fields. The field test was done in seven municipalities of Ilocos Norte.



The research revealed that weekly use of tobacco scraps significantly reduced the population of golden kuhol from 60 to 90 percent.



"The affected area was minimized by 80 percent and damaged hills by 84 percent. Where farmers' practice and no treatment were employed, an average 23.39 percent and 4 percent reduction in population were observed, respectively," the research said.

Rice plants treated with tobacco scraps had better crop stand, greener leaves, and taller plants, the study added. The study also showed that fields treated with tobacco scraps produced the highest yield per hectare (7.37 t/ha) compared to farmers' practice (6.38 t/ha) and no control (6.19 t/ha).



The country's aqua-culture has also found a promising use for tobacco dust as it has been proven effective as molluscide against snails and other fish pond pest but also enhances the growth of the "lablab", a pond fish-food.



Again, tobacco dust leaves no residue and is a perfect organic alternative in aquaculture farms. According to the NTA, tobacco dust acts swiftly to protect fish and its eggs from predatory snails and other creatures that exist in ponds and fish pens.

The NTA conducted field testing in fishponds in Bulacan, Pampanga, Bataan, Pangasinan and Ilocos Sur confirmed the validity of the scientific studies on tobacco dust and its benefits.



More initiative for investment, government funding





Hipolito Carlos, a former tobacco contract grower, said that initiatives for tobacco by-products have been seriously pursued by research done by the NTA and private entities.



"The immediate objective was to help local tobacco farmers earn more. While we should commend NTA for all it has done to discover the potentials of tobacco by-products we should also ask government to seriously consider the wider perspective of creating bigger industries on these by-products," Carlos said.



He shares the opinion of other businessmen in saying that such by-products could even benefit more tobacco farmers and even create bigger industries if there are investments coming in from the private and government sectors.



Carlos said investment on tobacco by-product industries, from the government and private sector, will not threaten the conventional use of tobacco for cigarette production and instead will produce off-shoot industries that can complement the industry. More industries depending on the different parts of tobacco would mean more farmers cultivating high-quality tobacco and more farmers benefiting from more industries.



Carlos said that there is a need for a shift to industrial and commercial approach rather than the small town cottage industry perspective.



For the people involved in the various research and promotion of tobacco by-products, it is not a question of whether or not these products will see their full potential in the wider commercialized market. Rather, it is a question of when government and the private sector investments and developments would come in. They earnestly hope that it will be soon.
BEST AGRICULTURE TV PROGRAM OR SEGMENT
“GOVERNOR GENEROSO SPECIAL”
KARREN MONTEJO, PRODUCER
AGRI TAYO DITO
ABS-CBN DAVAO
This episode visits the town of Governor Generoso in Davao Oriental and explores the rich natural wonders and the agriculture stories from the forests, farms and fisheries of this town in the southernmost tip of Mindanao.

FULL STORY
2016 BEST AGRICULTURE TV PROGRAM OR SEGMENT
PRIMER

VO: ISANG BAYAN SA TIMOG SILANGAN NG PILIPINAS NA LUBOS NA PINAGPALA NG PUONG MAYKAPAL!

VO: A TOWN LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEST PORTON OF THE PHILIPPINES THAT IS DEEPLY BLESSED BY THE HEAVENS ABOVE.



VO: BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO SA PROBINSYA NG DAVAO ORIENTAL!

VO: THE TOWN OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO IN THE PROVINCE OF DAVAO ORIENTAL!



VO: TILA NASA DULO NG BAHAGHARI ANG BAYANG ITO DAHIL SA MGA GININTUANG TOURIST SPOTS NA SIGURADONG DITO NIYO LANG MATATAGPUAN.

VO: YOU’LL FEEL THAT YOU ARE AT THE TIP OF THE RAINBOW BECAUSE OF THE GOLDEN TOURSIT SPOTS THAT YOU CAN ONLY FIND HERE.



VO: DITO RIN MATATAGPUAN ANG TANYAG NA CENTENNIAL TREE..

VO: YOU CAN ALSO FIND HERE THE FAMOUS CENTENNIAL TREE.



ONCAM RUBEN[1]: AT NASAKSIHAN NG PUNONG ITO ANG PAGYABONG NG PAG-AAGRIKULTURA NG BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO

ONCAM RUBEN: AND THIS TREE WITNESSED THE GROWTH OF THE SECTOR OF AGRICULTURE OF THE TOWN OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO.



VO: AT ANG MALAPARAISONG SIGABOY ISLAND!

VO: AND THE BEAUTIFUL SIGABOY ISLAND!



VO: MULA SA KABISERA NG BANSA, MARARATING ANG BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO SA PAMAMAGITAN NG PAGSAKAY NG EROPLANO PAPUNTA SA PANDAIGDIGANG PALIPARAN NG DAVAO, AT PAGSAKAY SA BUS PAPUNTANG GOVERNOR GENEROSO NA MARARATING MO LAMANG SA LOOB NG TATLO HANGGANG APAT NA ORAS!

VO: FROM MANILA, YOU CAN REACH THE TOWN OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO BY RIDING AN AIRPLANE TO THE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT OF DAVAO, AND RIDING A BUS TO THE TOWN OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO WHICH CAN TAKE YOU UP TO FOUR HOURS.



VO: MULA SA MATATARIK NA KAGUBATAN, MAYAYAMANG SAKAHAN, HANGGANG SA MALALAWAK NA KARAGATAN, TANAW MO ANG TUNAY NITONG KASAGANAAN AT KAGANDANDAHAN!

VO: FROM ITS GRANDIOUS FORESTS, RICH FARMS, TO ITS VAST SEAS, YOU CN REALLY SEE ITS BOUNTY AND BEAUTY.





[1] RUBEN GONZAGA – HOST, AGRI TAYO DITO

ONCAM RUBEN: MASAGANANG UMAGA, MGA KA-AGRING KAPAMILYANG PINOY! MULA DITO SA SOUTHERNMOST TIP NG ISLA NG MINDANAO, ATING TUKLASING ANG NATATAGONG YAMAN NG BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO DITO SA PROBINSYA NG DAVAO ORIENTAL. RUBEN GONZAGA PO, AGRI TAYO DITO!

ONCAM RUBEN: A BOUNTIFUL MORNING TO ALL OUR KA-AGRING KAPAMILYANG PINOY! FROM THE SOUTHERMOST TIP OF MINDANAO ISLAND, WE WILL DISCOVER THE HIDDEN GEMS OF AGRICULTURE HERE IN GOVERNOR GENEROSO, DAVAO ORIENTAL. I AM RUBEN GONZAGA, AGRI TAYO DITO!



PRIMER

VO: KOMPLETOS REKADOS ANG BAYANG ITONG KUNG ITURING DAHIL DI LANG MGA MAGAGANDANG TANAWIN NITO ANG IYONG HAHANAPHANAPIN KUNDI PATI NA RIN ANG BIYAYA NG PAG-AAGRIKULTURA NA IYONG TUNAY NA MAMAHALIN!

VO: THIS TOWN IS COMPLETE WITH WONDERS, FROM ITS TOURIST SPOTS TO ITS RICH AGRICULTURE SECTOR WHICH YOU WILL LOVE.



ONCAM ORENCIA[1]: MGA KA-AGRI, SUROY-SUROY TA DIRI SA SIGABOY

ONCAM ORENCIA: LET’S VISIT AND ENJOY SIGABOY.



VO: KAYA TUTOK NA, MGA KA-AGRI, SA MGA NATATANGING AGRI-KWENTONG HATID NG KAGUBATAN, SAKAHAN, PANGISDAAN AT NG MGA MAGIGILIW NA MAMAMAYAN NG BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO!

VO: SO BE AMAZED BY THE AMAZING AGRICULTURE STORIES FROM ITS FORESTS, FARMS, FISHERIES AND THE WONDERFUL PEOPLE OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO!



HYPE



VO: KAYA NAMAN NGAYONG UMAGA!

VO: THIS MORNING!



VO: MAMANGHA SA ISANG PUNO NA LIKAS NA TUMUTUBO SA MALALAWAK NA KAGUBATAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO!

VO: BE AMAZED BY THE TREE THAT RICHLY GROWS IN THE VAST FORESTS OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO!



VO: AT ATIN RING TUKLASIN ANG NAKAMIT NA BIYAYA NG ISANG GOV GENIAN NA MAGSASAKA DAHIL SA PAGPAPARAMI NIYA NG CACAO.

VO: ALSO, LET’S DISCOVER THE BLESSINGS THAT A GOV GENIAN FARMER GOT FROM HIS CACAO PLANTATION.



VO: AT WAG NA WAG NIYONG PALALAMPASIN ANG KWENTO NG INSPIRASYON NG ATING MANGIGISDANG AGRIBIDA NA NABIYAYAAN NG PAG-ASA MULA SA KARAGATAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO AT….

VO: AND DON’T MISS THE STORY OF INSPIRATION OF OUR FISHERMAN AGRIBIDA THAT WAS BLESSED WITH HOPE FROM THE SEAS OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO AND…



ONCAM RUBEN: NAHIHILO NA AKO!

ONCAM RUBEN: I FEEL REALLY DIZZY!



VO: PERO BAGO ANG LAHAT NG YAN, MGA MALINAMNAM PRODUKTONG GAWA MULA SA MGA HALAMANG UGAT NA UBE AT CASSAVA NA TATAK GOVERNOR GENEROSO ANG AMING IPAPATIKIM SA INYO DITO LANG SA SARAP KITA!

VO: BUT BEFORE THAT, WE WILL LET YOU TASTE DELICIOUS PRODUCTS MADE FROM THE CROPS OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO ONLY HERE IN SARAP KITA!



VTR 1: SARAP KITA – UBE JAM & CASSAVA CAKE



VO: TALAGA NAMANG NAPAKASARAP.

VO: IT’S REALLY DELICIOUS.



VO: TAMIS AT LINAMNAM NITO NA TALAGA NAMANG BABALIK BALIKAN.

VO: YOU WILL TRULY LOVE ITS SWEETNESS AND TASTE.



VO: MALIBAN NGA SA MASAGANANG FISHING INDUSTRY, MATATAGPUAN DIN SA MALAPARAISONG BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO ANG MGA KAKANIN NA TALAGA NAMANG IYONG KAPAPANABIKAN.

VO: ASIDE FROM ITS BOUNTIFUL FISHING INDUSTRY, YOU AN ALSO FIND HERE IN GOVERNOR GENEOROSO, DAINTIES THAT YOU WILL LOVE AND ENJOY.



VO: DAHIL MULA SA MGA YAMANG BIYAYA MULA SA MALAWAK NA KARAGATAN, MATATAGPUAN DIN SA LUGAR ANG MGA PANANIM NG KANILANG MALALAWAK NA SAKAHAN NA ISA RIN SA PINAGKUKUNAN NG KITA NG ATING MGA KA-AGRING GOV GENIANS.

VO: FROM THE BOUNTY OF ITS VAST SEAS, YOU CAN ALSO FIND HERE THE CROPS FROM ITS RICH SOIL, WHERE OUR GOV GENIANS GET THEIR LIVELIHOOD.



VO: AT ISA SA MGA PANANIM NA LIKAS DITO AY ANG MGA HALAMANG UGAT NA SYANG PINAGMUMULAN NG MGA BENTANG BENTANG KAKANIN NA TULAD NG UBE JAM AT CASSAVA CAKE.

VO: ROOT CROPS ARE NATURALLY GROWN HERE WHICH ARE MAIN INGREDIENTS OF THEIR BEST- SELLING UBE JAM AND CASSAVA CAKE.



VO: AT ISANG TANYAG NA GUMAGAWA NG MGA PANGHIMAGAS NA ITO AY SI ATE DELIA DIZON.

VO: AND ONE FAMOUS GOV GENIAN THAT MAKES THESE DELICACIES IS MISS DELIA DIZON.



VO: ISANG KAPAMPANGAN SI ATE DELIA KAYA HINDI MAPAGKAKAILA ANG KANYANG PAGKAHILIG SA PAGLULUTO.

VO: MISS DELIA IS A KAPAMPANGAN, WHICH ARE USUALLY IN TO COOKING.



ONCAM DELIA[2]: AT FIRST AUGMENTATION OF INCOME LANG YAN KAYA NGA MAY MGA

COLLEGE NA KAMING MGA ANAK. AFTER THREE YEARS, NAKITA NAMIN ANG

RESULTA NA DI LANG PALA AUGMENTATION. MALAKING TULONG. DATI KUMUKUHA

KAMI NG RAW MATERIALS, MALAYO PA. AFTER THREE YEARS, MARAMI NA PO

KAMING FARMER, ITO PO LOCAL NA LANG. FROM SEVEN PESOS,

IBEBENTA SA AKIN NG THIRTY PESOS. KUNG IDIDIRECT KO MISMO SA FARMER,

AT LEAST NAKAKATULONG SILA SA AKIN AT NAKAKATULONG AKO

SA KANILA.

ONCAM DELIA: AT FIRST, IT WAS JUST AUGMENTATION OF INCOME TO HELP SUPPORT THE

EDUCATION OF MY CHILDREN. AFTER THREE YEARS, IT BECAME MORE THAN

JUST AUGMENTATION. IT WAS REALLY A BIG HELP. WE HAD A LOT FARMERS. WE BUY

IT DIRECTLY FROM THEM AT A HIGH PRICE. IT’S CONVENIENT FOR ME. AT LEAST,

THE HELP IS MUTUAL. I CAN HELP THEM, AND THEY CAN HELP ME AT THE SAME TIME.



VO: KAYA NAMAN SYEMPRE, SA PAGBISITA NAMIN KAY ATE DELIA, NAGPATURO NA RIN AKO KUNG PAANONG GINAGAWA ITONG KANYANG NAPAKASARAP NA UBE JAM AT CASSAVA CAKE.

VO: AND DURING MY VISIT AT MISS DELIA’S KITCHEN, SHE WAS ABLE TO TEACH ME ON HOW TO MAKE THESE DELICIOUS UBE JAM AND CASSAVA CAKE.



VO: UNA NAMING GINAWA AY CASSAVA CAKE. KAYA HINANDA MUNA NI ATE DELIA ANG AMING MGA KAKAILANGANIN.

VO: WE FIRST MADE THE CASSAVA CAKE. THE INGRETDIENTS ARE



VO: ITO AY ANG KINUDKOD NA CASSAVA, CONDENSED MILK, EVAPORATED MILK, ITLOG, COCONUT MILK, MARGARINE, AT WHITE SUGAR.

VO: GRATED CASSAVA, CONDENSED MILK, EVAPORATED MILK, EGG, COCONUT MILK, MARGARIN AND WHITE SUGAR.

:

ONCAM RUBEN: ANO PO ANG UNANG GAGAWIN NATIN?

ONCAM RUBEN: WHAT WILL WE DO FIRST?



ONCAM DELIA: PIPINUHIN ANG CASSAVA. PINUONG PINO ACTUALLY

ONCAM DELIA: WE SHOULD GRATE THE CASSAVA FIRST.



ONCAM RUBEN: ANO PO YUNG UNANG-UNA NA ILALAGAY NATIN?

ONCAM RUBEN: WHAT WILL WE PUT FIRST?



VO: IDINAGDAG NA RIN NAMING ANG, CONDENSED MILK, WHITE SUGAR, ITLOG AT COCONUT MILK.

VO: WE ADDED THE CONDENSED MILK, WHITE SUGAR, EGG AND COCONUT MILK.



VO: PAGKTAPOS AY PAGHALUIN ITO.

VO: WE THEN MIX IT PROPERLY.



VO: KAPAG NAIHALO NA NG MAIGI ANG MGA SANGKAP, LAGYAN NG MARGARINE O BUTTER ANG TRAY NA PAGLALAGYAN UPANG DI DUMIKIT ANG CASSAVA SA TRAY, BAGO ISALIN DITO ANG CASSAVA MIXTURE.

VO: IF WE ALREADY MIXED IT PROPERLY, PUT SOME MARGARING ON THE TRAY SO THAT THE CASSAVA WON’T STICK HARD TO THE TRAY.



VO: PAGKATAPOS AY ISALANG NA ITO SA OVEN. PARA SA ATING MGA KA-AGRI NA WALANG OVEN, MAAARI RIN GUMAMIT NG IBANG LUTOAN TULAD NG PUGON.

VO: THEN, LET’S PUT IT ON THE OVEN. AND FOR OUR VIEWERS WHO DON’T HAVE OVEN, YOU CAN USE YOU FIREPLACE.



ONCAM RUBEN: AYAN NAILAGAY NA NATIN SA OVEN. SO MAGHIHINTAY PA TAYO NG MGA ILANG ORAS.

ONCAM RUBEN: HOW LONG DO WE HAVE TO WAIT?



ONCAM DELIA: ISANG ORAS.

ONCAM DELIA: ONE HOUR.



VO: HABANG HINIHINTAY NAMING MALUTO ANG CASSAVA CAKE, IPNAKITA DIN SA AKIN NI ATE DELS KUNG PAANO GINAGAWA ANG UBE JAM.

VO: WHILE WE ARE WAITING FOR THE CASSAVA CAKE TO BE COOKED, SHE ALSO SHOWED TO ME HOW TO MAKE THE UBE JAM.



VO: KINAKAILANGAN LAMANG NG NILAGANG UBE, CONDENSED MILK, EVAPORATED MILK, ASUKAL, MARGARINE AT COCONUT MILK.

VO: WE JUST NEED THE STEWED UBE, CONDENSDED MILK, EVAPORATED MILK, SUGAR, MARGARINE, AND COCONUT MILK.



VO: IPAGHALO HALO LAMANG ANG MGA SANGKAP, ISALIN AT MAAARI NA ITONG ILUTO NG HANGGANG ISANG ORAS.

VO: WE JUST HAVE TO MIX THE INGREDIENTS AND BAKE IT FOR ONE HOUR.



VO: BUKOD SA ANGKING LINAMNAM NG MGA PRODUKTONG ITO, HATID DIN NITO ANG MAYAMANG PANGKALUSUGANG BENEPISYO KATULAD NG FIBER NA PAMPAGINHAWA NG ATING DIGESTIVE SYSTEM AT PANGIWAS SA COLON CANCER.

VO: ASIDE FROM ITS TASTE, IT ALSO HAS BENEFITS TO OUR BODY. IT IS RICH IN FIBER FOR A GOOD DIGESTION FLOW AND PREVENTION FROM COLON CANCER.



VO: SA PUHUNUNANG 380 PESOS, SA PAGGAWA NG CASSAVA CAKE AY MAKAKAGAWA KA NA NG SIXTEEN SERVINGS NA MAARAING IBENTA NG SIXTY PESOS BAWAT ISA. KAYA MAY SARAP KITA KA NA 580 PESOS.

VO: WITH THE CAPITAL OF 380 PESOS, IN MAKING CASSAVA CAKE, YOU AN ALREADY MAKE SIXTEEN SERVINGS WHICH YOU CAN SELL FOR SIXTY PESOS PER SERVING. YOU HAVE A PROFIT OF 580 PESOS.



VO: AT SA PUHUNAN NAMAN NA 356 PESOS SA PAGGAWA NAMAN NG UBE JAM. AY MAKAKAGAWA KA NA NG SIYAM NA SERVINGS, NA MAAARING IBENTA NG 100 PESOS BAWAT ISA. KAYA MAY SARAP KITA KA NG 544 PESOS.

VO: AND WITH THE CAPITAL OF 356 PESOS IN MAKING UBE JAM, YOU CAN ALREADY MAKE NINE SERVINGS WHICH YOU CAN SELL FOR 100 PESOS PER SERVING. SO YOU HAVE A PROFIT OF 544 PESOS.



VO: KAYA NAMAN KA-AGRI, TANDAANG MULI ANG MGA KAILANGAN AT PARAAN SA PAGGAWA NITONG CASSAVA CAKE AT UBE JAM

VO: HERE ARE THE INGREDIENTS AND PROCESS IN MAKING CASSAVA CAKE AND UBE JAM.



VO: ANUMANG LIKAS YAMANG HATID NG AGRIKULTURA, AY MAAARING MAGHATID NG SAGANA KATULAD NA LAMANG SA TAGUMPAY NA NAKAMTAN NG ISANG GOV GENIAN NA SI ATE DELIA.

VO: WHATEVER OUR AGRICULTURE GIVES US, IT COULD GIVE US RICH RESULTS LIKE THE SUCCESS STORY OF MISS DELIA.



ONCAM DELIA: NAKAPAGPATAPOS NA KAMI NG MGA BATA. NANDUN LAHAT NG GAIN NAMIN, NASA MGA BATA.

ONCAM DELIA: MY CHILDREN GRADUATED IN COLLEGE. THEY WERE MY INSPIRATION, MY KIDS.



ONCAM BOTH: SARAP KITA!



HYPE TO VTR 2: ITANIM NA YAN – CACAO



VO: SUSUNOD…

VO: UP NEXT



VO: TAMPOK NAMIN ANG MGA AGRI-KAALAMAN SA ALMACIGA AT CACAO NA LIKAS SA BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO SA PAGBABALIK NG AGRI TAYO DITO!

VO: WE BRING YOU THE KNOWLEDGE ON ALMACIGA AND CACAO THAT ARE RICH HERE IN GOVERNOR GENEROSO WHEN AGRI TAYO DITO RETURNS.



END OF BODY 1











BODY 2



VTR 3: ITANIM NA YAN – CACAO



VO: KINILALA MAN BILANG PANGUNAHING PRODUCER NG NIYOG ANG PROBINSYA NG DAVAO ORIENTAL, ALAM NIYO BANG KASABAY NA DIN NGAYON SA PAG-ANGAT NG INDUSTRIYA NANG PAGNI-NIYOG, LALO’NG LALO NA DITO MISMO SA BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENERESO, ANG PAGKA-CACAO?

VO: GOVERNER GENEROSO IS KNOWN AS A PRIMARY PRODUCER OF COCONUT IN THE PROVINCE OF DAVAO ORIENTAL. ASIDE FROM THE BOOMING COCONUT INDUSTRY IS ALSO THE RISE OF CACAO INDUSTRY HERE.



VO: AT MAKIKILALA NATIN ANG ISANG NAPAKHUSAY NA CACAO GROWER DITO SA KANILANG BAYAN UPANG IBAHAGI SA ATIN ANG ILAN SA KANYANG MGA SIKRETO SA PAGKA-CACAO.

VO: AND WE WILL GET TO KNOW AN EXCELLENT CACAO GROWER HERE TO SHARE HIS SECRET IN CACAO GROWING…



ONCAM RUBEN: WALANG IBA KUNDI SI BOY ARREZA

ONCAM RUBEN: NO OTHER THAN, MR. BOY ARREZA.



ONACAM BOY[3]: AKO PERSONALLY AY MAGSASAKA NG CORN AT TSAKA NAGTANIM PO AKO NG

BANANA AT MGA NIYOG TSAKA MAY MANGO. SA NGAYON, NAMAN AY

BUMALIK NAMAN KAMI SA FOCUS DITO SA PAGTATANIM NG CACAO. PARANG

NAKIKITA KO NA ANG PAGTATANIM NG CACAO AY MAKATULONG PO

TALAGA SA AMIN LALO NA SA AKIN BILANG ISANG MAGSASAKA. ANG

PAGSEEDLING PO O PAGGAWA NG NURSERY AY MALAKI ANG

NAITULONG ISIPIN LANG PO NATIN ISANG BAG NG CACAO MERON SIYANG

LAMAN NA 38 NA LISO. AT KAPAG NA- ISEEDLING MO NA YAN, SIGURADO

NAMAN NA MAGKAPERA KA KASI ANG BAWAT SEEDLING BINEBENTA KO PO

NG SAMPUNG PISO PAG UNGRAFTED AT 20 PESOS NAMAN KAPAG GRAFTED.

ONCAM BOY: I WAS FIRST A CORN FARMER. THEN I STARTED PLANTING COCONUT, BANANA

AND MANGO. AND NOW WE FOCUSED IN CACAO BECAUSE IT REALLY BRINGS

WONDERFUL RESULTS TO US FARMERS. YOU CAN ALREADY PROFIT EVEN WHEN

YOU’RE JUST STARTING A NURSERY BECAUSE EACH CACAO FRUIT HAS 38 SEEDS

WHICH YOU CAN MAKE INTO SEEDLINGS. YOU CAN EARN FROM IT. UNGRAFTED

SEEDLINGS CAN BE SOLD AT TEN PESOS, AND THE GRAFTED SEEDLINGS AT 20 PESOS.









VO: AT SA KABILA PA NG BANTA NG EL NINO, NAGING POSITIBO SIYA SA PAGLABAN, AT TINUTUKAN ITO NANG MAIGI UPANG HINDI MAANTALA ANG PRODUKSYON SA PAGSU-SUPPLY NILA NG CACAO.

VO: AND DESPITE THE THREATS OF EL NINO, HE IS POSITIVE IN FIGHTING ITS EFFECTS, AND FOCUSED ON THE WAYS TO PROTECT HIS RICH PRODUCTION OF SUPPLY OF CACAO.



ONCAM BOY: PAG WALA KANG DISKARTE, PATAY TALAGA ANG TANIM MO. KAYA ANG GINAGAWA KO, NAGMA-MULCHING AKO. ANG GINAGAWA KASI NG PAGMA- MULCHING, BINIBIGYAN NIYA NG MOISTURE ANG ILALIM KAYA NAGPAPALAMIG ITO SA LUPA.

ONCAM BOY: IF YOU DON’T STRATEGIZE, YOUR CACAO WILL DIE. SO I DID MULCHING. IT GIVES MOISTURE TO THE SOILD AND COOLS THE TEMPERATURE OF AREA AROUND YOUR CACAO PLANT.



VO: NAGING KAHANGA-HANGA PARA SA LOKAL NILANG PAMAHALAAN ANG SAKAHAN NI PARENG BOY KAYA NAMAN PINARANGALAN NILA ITO NG “BEST IN CACAO PRODUCTION.”

VO: BECAUSE OF HIS EXCELLENCE, HE WAS AWARDED BY THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT “BEST IN CACAO PRODUCTION.”



ONCAM RUBEN: PWEDE NIYO BA AKONG TURUAN KUNG PAANO MAGTANIM NG CACAO?

ONCAM RUBEN: CAN YOU TEACH ME HOW TO PLANT CACAO?



VO: AYON KAY PARENG BOY, SA PAGTATANIM NG CACAO, KAKAILNGANIN LAMANG NATING ANG BOLO, PALA, SEEDLING NG CACAO, TUBIG, ORGANIC FERTILIZER, AT DAHON NG NIYOG.

VO: ACCORDING TO HIM, IN PLANTING CACAO, WE JUST HAVE TO NEED BOLO, SHOVEL, CACAO SEEDLING, WATER, ORGANIC FERTILIZER AND COCONUT LEAVES.



ONCAM BOY: MASYADONG MAINIT ANG PANAHON, AT MATIGAS ANG LUPA. KAYA AKO MAY BARA.

ONCAM BOY: THE WEATHER IS TOO HOT AND THE SOIL IS SO HARD. SO I HAVE A BARA.



ONCAM RUBEN: SO AKO ANG TAGA ALIS NG LUPA.

ONCAM RUBEN: I SHOULD REMOVE THE TILLED SOIL.



VO: PAGKATAPOS AY LAGYAN NG VERMICAST, TABUNAN NG LUPA.

VO: WE PUT VERMICAST AND THEN COVER IT WITH SOIL.



VO: PAGKATAPOS AY DILIGAN.

VO: AND THEN WE WATER IT.



ONCAM BOY: LAGYAN NG DAHON. ANG TAWAG NITO SHADING

ONCAM BOY: WE PUT COCONUT LEAVES. THIS IS WHAT WE CALL SHADING.



ONCAM BOY: LUMALAGO ANG CACAO INDUSTRY SA SIGABOY DAHIL SA ITO ANG TALAGANG TINUTUTUKAN NG DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SA MGA FARMERS NA DAPAT ANG MGA FARMERS AY MAGTANIM NG CACAO. DAHIL ANG CACAO NGAYON SA BUONG MUNDO AY MALAKI ANG DEMAND. TALAGANG NAGING RESPONSIVE ANG MGA FARMERS DITO SA GOVERNOR GENEROSO, AY NAKATULONG NAMAN ANG MGA TECHNICIANS NATIN SA PAGFOFOFLLOW—UP NG FARMERS. KINAKAILANGAN AY SIPAG, TIYAGA, AT MAYROONG PASENSYA, PAG WALA KANG PASENSYA, TALAGANG BABAGSAK KA.

ONCAM BOY: THE CACAO INDUSTRY HERE IS IMPROVING, BECAUSE OF THE HELP OF DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IN ENCOURAGING FARMERS TO TRY CACAO GROWING. THERE IS A BIG DEMAND OF CACAO RIGHT NOW IN THE WORLD MARKET. FARMERS HAVE BECOME RESPONSIVE, AND THE TECHNICIANS REALLY HELPED US ACHIEVE OUR GOALS. WE JUST NEED DEDICATION, HARDWORK AND PATIENCE. BECAUSE IF YOU DON’T HAVE PATIENCE, YOU WILL FAIL.




VO: HETONG MULI ANG MGA PARAAN SA PAGTATANIM NG CACAO!

VO: TAKE NOTE OF THE WAYS IN PLANTING CACAO.



VO: PATUNAY ANG KWENTO NG PAGSASAKA NI PARENG BOY NA HINDI NAGPAPAHULI ANG BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO SA MATAGUMPAY NA PAG-AAGRIKULTURA. SA PAMAMAGITAN NG TULONG-TULONG NA KOOPERASYON MULA SA MGA AHENSYA NG GOBYERNO AT NG MGA MAGSASAKA, MANGINGIBABAW ANG PAGKAKAISA PARA SA ADHIKAING MAPASIGLA ANG UMAANGAT NA AGRIKULTURA – ISANG REPLEKSYON SA GANDA NG KANILANG PAMAYANAN.

VO: HIS STORY IS A LIVING PROOF THAT THE GOVERNOR GENEROSO IS NOT BEHIND IN ACHIEVING SUCCESS IN AGRICULTURE. WITH THE HELP OF COOPERATION OF GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND THE FARMERS, THE UNITY WILL STAND OUT IN MAKING A BETTER ADVOCACY IN MAKING THEIR AGRICULTURE SECTOR A BOUNTIFUL ONE – A REFLECTION OF HOW BEAUTIFUL THEIR TOWN IS.



ONCAM RUBEN: HALAMANG NAGING KAYAMANAN SA PAG-AAGRIKULTURA NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO ABAY CACAO, ITANIM NA YAN!

ONCAM RUBEN: A PLANT THAT IS RICH IN GOVERNOR GENEROSO, CACAO, ITANIM NA YAN!



HYPE TO VTR 4: AGRIBIDA – EDDIE GO (FISHERMAN)



VO: SUSUNOD!

VO: UP NEXT!



ONCAM EDDIE: MAHIRAP TALAGA LALO NA ANG PINANSYAL NA ASPETO, PERO KAILANGAN NA KAHIT PAUNTI-UNTI MAKA-SURVIVE.

ONCAM EDDIE: FINANCIALLY, IT WAS REALLY DIFFICULT, BUT WE NEED TO DO IT SLOWLY TO SURVIVE.



VO: KILALANIN SIYA SA PAGBABALIK NG AGRI TAYO DITO!

VO: KNOW HIM BETTER WHEN AGRI TAYO DITO RETURNS!



END OF BODY 2



BODY 3



VTR 3: AGRIMAZING – ALMACIGA



VO: BUKOD SA KASAGANAAN SA MGA SAKAHAN NG BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO, DITO SA KANILANG MALALAWAK NA KAGUBATAN, NATURAL NA TUMUTUBO ANG ALMASIGA, PUNONG NAGHAHATID NG KASAGANAAN SA KANILANG MGA MAMAMAYAN

VO: ASIDE FROM THE BOUNTIFUL FAMRS OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO, YOU CAN ALSO FIND HERE IN THEIR VAST FORESTS THE ALMACIGA, WHICH NATURALLY GROWS HERE, THAT GIVES HOPE TO THEIR CITIZENS AND LOCALS.



VO: TINUTURING ANG GOVERNOR GENEROSO BILANG UNANG TRADING STATION NG ALMACIGA NA NAGSIMULA PA UMANO NOONG PANAHON NG MGA KASTILA.

VO: GOVERNOR GENEROSO WAS THE FIRST TRADING STATION OF ALMACIGA SINCE THE SPANISH REGIME.



VO: ANG ALMASIGA AY TUMUTUBO SA MGA KAGUBATAN NA NASA 450 TO 2,200 METERS ALTITUDE, IBIG SABIHIN, SA MATAAS NA PARTE LAMANG ITO NG BUNDOK MAKIKITA. AT DITO SA PILIPINAS, DALAWA LAMANG ANG NAGPOPRODUCE NG RESIN NITO, ANG PALAWAN AT DITO NGA SA GOV GEN.

VO: ALMASIGA EXCLUSIVELY GROWS IN FORESTS AT AN ALTITUDE OF 450 TO 2,200 ABOVE SEA LEVEL. IN THE PHILIPPINES, ONLY PALAWAN AND GOVERNOR GENEROSO PRODUCE ALAMASIGA RESINS.



VO: AT DAHIL LIKAS NGA ANG SA KAGUBATAN NG GOVGEN ANG PUNONG ITO AY BINIGYANG PANSIN ITO NG KANILANG LOKAL NA PAMAHALAN UPANG ITO AY MAPANATILI AT MAS DUMAMI PA SA PAMAMAGITAN NG PAGSASAGAWA A NG ISANG PROYEKTO.

VO: THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT DECIDED TO PROTECT THE AREA AND ESTABLISH A LIVELIHOOD PROJECT FOR THE LOCALS.



ONCAM JOEY[4]: SA NGAYON PO MERON PO KAMING 137 NA MEMBERS NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO, NA ANG GRUPO AY TINAWAG NG LUMAD ALMASIGA TAPPERS OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO AT TSAKA MERON HO KAMING 137,000 TAPPABLE TREES, DUN HO KAMI HUMUGOT NG CHANCE PARA MAGING KAAGAPAY PO KAMI NG MGA MAMAMAYAN NG BAYAN NG GOVERNOR GENEROSO PARA MAGING SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOOD PROJECT PO NILA.

ONCAM JOEY: FOR NOW, THE LUMAD ALMASIGA TAPPERS OF GOVERNOR GENEROSO IS COMPOSED OF 137 MEMBERS OR TAPPERS. AND WE HAVE 137,000 TAPPABLE TREES, WHICH HAS BECOME A SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOOD PROJECT FOR THE LOCALS HERE.



ONCAM GORME[5]: SO NAKITA PO NAMIN ANG POTENTIAL NA MAGING ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY LIVELIHOOD PROGRAM. HINDI MA DAMAGE YUNG PUNO DAHIL RESIN LANG KINUKUHA. NAGING SUSTAINABLE NA ANG OPERATION, DAHIL WALANG MAPUTOL, WALANG MA DAMAGE

ONCAM GORME: WE’VE SEEN THE POTENTIAL OF ALMASIGA AS AN ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY LIVELIHOOD PROGRAM. THE TREES WON’T BE DAMAGED BECAUSE WE WILL JUST HAVE TO GET THE RESIN. IT’S A SUSTAINABLE OPERATION. NO CUTTING OF TREES. NO DAMAGE.



VO: ANG ALMACIGA RESIN O MANILA COPAL AY GINAGAMIT SA PAGPOPROCESO NG VARNISH, PINTURA, SABON, PLASTIK, SHOE FOLISH AT FLOOR WAX.

VO: THE ALMASIGA RESIN OR MANILA COPAL IS A PRIMARY INGREDIENT IN PROCESSIN VARNISH, PAINT, SOAP, PLASTIC, SHOE POLISH OR FLOOR WAX.



VO: ABA’Y AKALIN NIYO MGA KA-AGRI NA MARAMI PA LANG TAYONG NAGAGAWANG PRODUKTO MULA SA PUNONG ITO. KAYA NAMAN AY DINALA TAYO NI SIR JOEY SA KANILANG ECO-PARK SA
Text
BEST AGRICULTURE RADIO PROGRAM OR SEGMENT
“CHEAP, EASY AND PRACTICAL WAYS TO TEST SOIL PH LEVEL USING MATERIALS THAT ARE READILY AVAILABLE AT HOME”
ARIEL TEJADA
AGRI-TAYO PIDDIG!
DWCI-FM, PIDDIG, ILOCOS NORTE
Agriculture Secretary Manny Piñol has ordered the updating of soil analysis data nationwide. Though this is best done in a laboratory, it is expensive and, due to limited number of labs with such capability, also difficult. This episode discusses the various methods that farmers can test the soil themselves using materials that can be easily found at home.
FULL STORY
2016 BEST AGRICULTURE RADIO PROGRAM OR SEGMENT
“BEST AGRICULTURE RADIO PROGRAM OR SEGMENT”
ARIEL TEJADA
DWCI-FM, Piddig, Ilocos Norte


Agri-tayo Piddig!

August 19, 2016


KASANO A MAAMMOAM TI ACIDITY KEN ALKALINITY TI DAGAM USAR LAENG DAGITI BANAG A MABALINMO A MAKITA ITI UNEG TI BALAYMO

Okay, agsubsubli ti programatayo Agri Tayo Piddig ditoy laeng 105.1 DWCI FM.

Again apo ulitek ti hotline tayo para kadagitay kayatnan to ti agsaludsod, iti daytoy topikotayo apo iti daytoy a bigat, ken kasta metten dagiti suhestion, mabalin payen dagiti pangablaawyo kakailian. Itext laeng iti hotlinetayo 09369971108.

Okay intayon apo iti topikotayo nga insaganatayo iti daytoy a bigat.

Ammoyo apo, daytoy maipanggep iti daga a pagmulaantayo kadagiti mulatayo a pagay, natnateng – vegetables, wenno dadumapay, importante la unay a maamoantayo daytay kalidadna.

No ania a klase a daga, ania ti kalidadna – nabaknang kadi kadagiti organiko a banag? Adda kadi ti makunkuna a fertilidadna wenno tay soil fertility na? Masapol a maammoan ken of course daytoy acidity daytoy daga, importante unay daytoy.

Kasi ditoy a nakasalalay daytay panagbiag dayta mulatayo. Uray ania man ti imulatayo gagayyem ken kakabsat.

So iti daytoy a bigat, kas nangeganyon kadagiti immununan a panagprogramatayo, addan iti napasamaken a soil analysis iti ilitayo a Piddig during the administration of Mayor Eddie Guillen, nangisayangkatda ti pannaka-analyse dagitay dagdagatayo, dagiti appo a mannalon tapnon no kasta no agipakat kay ton kadagiti fertilizer ammoyon no ana ti ipakatyo, ania a klase ti fertilizer ti masapol dayta dagam especially no inka agbayad iti amilyar.

Ka geddanton daytay inka panagbayad ti amilyar ah ket tay maammoam to metten no kumusta ti kasasaad dayta dagam – ania dagiti masapolmo a fertilizer. That way, awan dagiti masaysayang nga ipakpakatyo (a fertilizer) yanta daga same as tay acidity na.

Ah ket tay nangeganyon iti sabali pay a panag programatayo, iti met Paspas Dur-as, Ni Governor Imee Maros daytoy met ti maysa a plano nan eh, iti intero nga Ilocos Norte, soil analysis! Makita ti kasasaad dagita daga a pagtatalonan.

And, ni President Rodrigo Duterte through Secretary Manny PIñol kasta metten ti plano da nga ubraen intero a pagilian a Pilipinas.

Ngem ditoy ilitayo a Piddig, nabayagen apo a nakaunatayo.

(BREAKER)

Ngem ammoyo kadi appo, no ti pagsasaritaan ket daytay panangkita laeng iti acidity dayta daga, daytay pH levelna, kayang-kayam a makita kano apo no acidic dayta dagam wenno saan uray saanmo mapan ipa-laboratoryo daytay soil samplena.

Oh ha! Kasano sir? Kunayo ngata aya.

Adda ditoy dagiti techniquena. Tallo laeng a wagas. Kumbaga ket Home Remedy – mabalinmo nga ubraen usar laeng dagitay banag nga addan mismo dita uneg ti balayyo.

Saanmon a masapol ti gumatang pay iti kumplikado nga aparato, or saan ket mang-hire iti eksperto a manangalisar dayta dagam, or mapan ‘yan ti soil laboratory tapno ma testing dayta dagam.

Kasi aglalo no medyo agtiptupidka bassit, awan ti kuwarta a pagpa-test mo, mabalinmo nga ubraen dagitoy, dagitoy nga home remedy kumbaga nga panangkita no dayta dagam ket acidic wenno saan.

(BREAKER)

Kuna ngamin dagitay eksperto aponga ti panangammom iti pH level yanta dagam ket very crucial sakbay iti panagmula, ah, ket dapat ket no ti panangalisarmo ta dagam isu pay ti mang determinar no ania a klase ti crop, ana a kalse ti mula ti dumakkel iti dayta a daga gagayyem ken kakabsat.

Siempre, haan tay met mailibak a ti maysa a soil laboratory isu ti “the best” nga paka determinaran no kumusta dayta dagam, ngem no daduma masapolmo ti aggasto kasi agbayad ka ken manmano dagiti soil laboratory iti lugartayo, especially ditoy Ilocos Norte I think dita lang Batac ti maysa nga adda eh, dita asideg ti MMSU.

Ket iti kaudianen a panagsuksukisok dagiti eksperto, dagitay daga ditoy Pilipinas mabalinmo kano a ma determinar iti pH level na or ti status ti acidity na babaen kadagiti sumaganad, denggenyon ah. Dagitoy dagiti nagduduma a method tallo laengnga mabalinmo a matest ti soil pH iti kabukbukudanyo a lugar.

Umuna ti amin, daytoy panagusar ti litmus paper. Litmus paper alisto lang a magatang dayta apo.

Daytoy litmus paper apo maibilang ngamin ah pH sensitive paper. Kayatna sawen, no maikkan iti naalsem unay a banag – daytay acidic – ket adda ti panagbalbaliw ti colorna, gagayyem ken kakabsat.

So daytoy litmus paper ket maususar tapno ma determinar ti acidity as well as the alkalinity iti maysa substancde.

It comes in pairs eh, red and blue litmus paper.

Daytoy red litmus paper agbalin a blue under alkaline condition. Daydiay met blue litmus paper agbalin a red under acidic conditions. So as simple as that.

Ti pumay-an tayo appo, tapno mausarmo daytoy litmus paper nga ma determinarmo ti pH level dayta dagam ay ket simple lang, kastoy ti ubraem kabsat:

Mangalaka ti sample daytay daga nga itestmo iti uneg iti maysa a garrapon wenno container. Nayunam ti distilled water so that agbalin a paste ti kitana, kasla agpitak gagayyem ken kakabsat.

And then, ipanmo tay litmus paper ken obserbarem no adda ti panagsukat ti color na.

No daytay red a litmus paper agbalin a blue kayatna sawen tay dagam ket alkaline soil. Ngem no daydiay blue a litmus paper nagbalin a red, kayatna sawen dayta dagam ket acidic gagayyem ken kakabsat.

(BREAKER)

As simple as that appo a mannalon, aya.

Ulitek, mangalaka ti sample a daga, ipanmo ti garrapon, danumam bassit a tay medyo agpalet kasla pitak, mangalaka ti litmus paper.

No tay red nagbalin a blue kayatna sawen appo ket dayta dagam ket alkaline soil, ngem no daytay blue nagbalin a red acidic nokua dayta dagam.

So panagusar ti litmus paper.

Maikadua, ti panagusar ti suka ken. Oh, mabalin pay gayam ah. Suka mabalinmi masarakan dita uneg ti balaymo, baking soda adda latta dita uneg ti balaymo. No awan nalaka lang a gatangen ta baking soda. Awan pay siguro 20 pesos or 30 pesos kadagita paglakoan gagayyem ken kakabsat.

So suka ken baking soda.

Kasano da met apo nga mausar dagitoy tapno madeterminarmo nga acidic wenno saan dayta daga a pagmulaam .

(BREAKER)

Dagitoy dua apo a material nga ibagbagatayo, daytoy suka ken baking soda usually ususaren iti panagluto, di ba?

Kadagitay karinderia, kadagiti restaurant , dita uneg ti balay, dagitoy ket usaren a pagluto.

Ngem ammoyo kadi apo a dagitoy dua nga ingredients tay itatta ket agpada a sensitive iti acid ken kasta metten alkaline ket mausarmo pay kano a mang determinar ti acidity dayta dagam. Daytay pH level dayta dagam.

Napakasimple kano manen apo ti ubraem, awan taty kumplikado unay nga kumabaga ket methodna wenno step na.

Tay kankanayon ibaga ni Mayor Eddie Guillen-en nga saan a rocket science, dagitoy ket simple laeng nga ubraen.

Dagitoy a materials ket siempre mangala ka sample ti daga manen a kayat mo a ma testing. Inka diay talonmo, mangalaka ti sample ti daga.

Daytay innalam a sample no koma sanga-tasa ket i-divide mo into two portions and ipanmo iti plastic.

Dagitay sample, agsinnumbangir, nayunam ti half a tasa nga suka ipanmo diay ayan ti maysa a sample.

No adda dagitay kunkunana nga… adda tayt rumuar a bubbles, adda ti rapid bubbles a rumuar. Kayatna sawen daytay kasla burekna, adda rumuar a kasla burekna kayatna sawen daytay pH level ti daga… maysa daytoy nga alkaline soil kunak kuma, ket ti pH levelna ket ag rage from 7-8 gaggayyem ken kakabsat no kasdiay ti pumay-am.

No met icheckmo no acidic dayta daga, nayunam ti distilled water didiay (soil) sample until a didiay daga ket agbalin a kasla pitak. Nayunam ti gudwa tasa a baking soda ket no i-fizzle na tay bubbles na kayatna sawen daydiay dagam ket acidic, addaan ti pH level raging between 5 and 6.

Ket no saan pulos a nag react daydiay daga, awan pulos ti makitam a chemical reaction na kayatna sawen neutral, haan nga acidic haan nga alkaline, normal lang.

Ayan, simple a wagas a ma testing daytay daga usar iti suka ken baking soda kakailian.

(BREAKER)

Ken kamaudiananna nga simple a wagas tapnon makitam daytay pH level dayta dagam.

Panagusar iti nalabbaga a repolyo.

Sinno kadakayon apo ti nakakitan iti nalabbaga a repolyo? Siak nakakita nakon. Iti ammo tay pay idi a ket display, display sa met daytoy a repolyo apay kastoy kitana kunkuna tay idi kua ket talaga gayam nga adda ti nalabagga a repolyo.

Haan met a tay nalabbaga a nalabbaga ngem medyo ag violet ti kulayna gagayyem ken kakabsat.

Mabalinmo nga usaren to determine the pH level iti aniaman a substance nga mailaok kadaytoy a klase ti repolyo.

Ket tapno madeterminarmo ti pH level dayta dagam usar daytoy a repolyo, daytoy red cabbage a kunkunatayo ket matadtad, kasla agtadtadka tay para laok ti pansit, kasdiay, usar ti maysa a kutsilyo gagayyem kenkakabsat.

Kalpasanna apo, ipaburekmo daytay distilled water ken later on inayon mo kadaytay natadtad a cabbage. So mangpaburekka paylaeng ti danum samonto inayon tay tinadtadmo a cabbage.

And then ibabadmo, iyupermo for about 20 minutes kadaydiay a naipaburek a danum sakbay nga ikkatem dagitay solid particles na, dagitay natadtaden apo a cabbage gagayyem ken kakabsat.

Ti laeng naibati nokuan daytay violet ti colorna a liquid, dayty nokua apo addaan iti neutral nga pH level segun kadagiti ekspert.

(BREAKER)

Kalpasanna apo, dagitay violet ti kulaynan nga liquid ipakbom iti dua nga agsina a tasa wenno baso. And then mangalaka iti soil sample, daytoy soil sample nga innalam siempre i-dividemo into two metlaeng. Ipanmo kadagitay saggaysa a cup.

And then ti pumayam apo ket daytoy daga, in-inot nga ipanmo idiay tasa. Sangka-bassit la kano umanayen ti dua a tea spoon.

Urayem aginggana 20 minutes, obserbarem no agsukat/agbaliw daytay kulayna daytoy tatta liquid a nagpa burekam ti red a cabbage.

No daytay mixture saan a nagbalbaliw it means daytay dagam ket neutral nga addaan pH level a 6.5 to 7.

Ngem no daytay violet a danom, a mixture apo, nagbalin a pink kayatna sawen daytay dagam ket acidic with a pH level value of 1-7. The brighter the pink color apo, no narangrang tay pink a kulayna ad-adda nga acidic dayta dagam.

No daytay mixture met kano apo ket nagbalin a green, daytay dagam ket maibilang nga alkaline soil with a pH level value ranging manipud 8-14. No nabra-bright daydiay green a colorna, kayatna sawen adu iti alkaline na dayta dagam.

As simple as that.

-end-

ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

CHEAP, EASY, AND PRACTICAL WAYS TO TEST SOIL PH LEVEL USING MATERIALS THAT ARE READILY AVAILABLE AT HOME



Knowing the pH (acidity and alkalinity) of a soil is very crucial before planting. It is used to identify crop suitability in specific areas. It will also help our farmers in determining what kinds of fertilizers should be applied.

Agriculture Secretary Manny Piñol has ordered the updating of soil analysis data nationwide.

Piñol said national soil testing and sampling is very vital in determining which region of the country could grow which crop best based on soil components and fertility (including acidity and alkalinity).

Laboratory is the best place where this test can be carried out but it is expensive, aside from the fact that there are only few soil laboratories in the country.

The Provincial Government of Ilocos Norte headed by Gov. Imee Marcos, in coordination with the Department of Agriculture Regional Office 1, is conducting a massive soil fertility analysis in Ilocos Norte to assess the quality and determine the growth potential of soils across the province.

Farmers, however, can determine the soil pH of their farmland using only materials that can be found at home.

There are different methods farmers can test soil pH on their own, these are:

Using litmus paper

Litmus paper is a pH sensitive paper used to determine the acidity and alkalinity of a substance. It comes in pairs, a red and blue litmus paper. Red litmus paper turns blue under alkaline conditions while blue litmus paper turns red under acidic conditions.

To use the Litmus paper determine soil pH, get the sample of the soil to be tested inside a container, add distilled water to it so that it looks slurry or form paste. Insert the Litmus papers and observe the change in color. If the red litmus paper turns blue it means the soil is an alkaline soil and if the blue turns red, it means the soil is an acidic soil.

Using vinegar and baking soda

These two materials are common materials used in food industries, they are both sensitive to both acid and alkaline. They can be used to determine the pH of a soil.

To use these materials to determine soil pH, collect the soil sample to be tested, divide the soils into two portions and pour each in a plastic. Add half cup of Vinegar into one sample, if it effervesces (that is it brings out rapid bubbles) it means the soil is alkaline with pH ranging between 7-8.

To check if the soil is acidic, add distilled water (This is the water gotten from the cooling of the water vapour that evolves when you boil water or can also be gotten from chemist shops) to the other sample until the soil gets muddy, add half cup of baking powder to it. If it fizzles our bubbles, it means the soil is acidic with pH ranging between 5 and 6. However, if the soils did not react at, it means it is neutral.

Using red cabbage and distilled water

Red cabbage is a common vegetable, the solution from the cabbage can be used to Determine the pH of any substance it comes in contact with.

To determine the pH of the soil using these materials, the red cabbage is chopped into pieces with a knife. Boil the distilled water and later add the chopped red cabbage, allow it to soak for about 20 minutes before you evacuate the solid particles of the cabbage leaving the purple-colored liquid, with a neutral pH.

Pour the liquids into two different cups, divide the soil to be tested into two with each portion in different cups, pour little quantity of the liquid into little quantity of the soil like 2 full teaspoons. Wait for about 40 minutes to observe the change in color.

If the mixture is purple in color, it means the sand is neutral with a pH of about 6.5-7. If the mixture turns pink, it means the soil is acidic with a pH value of between 1-7, the brighter the pink color, the more acidic the soil is. If the mixture turns green it implies that the soil is alkaline with a pH value ranging from 8 – 14, the brighter the green color the more alkaline the soil is.

Accurate result can be achieved through the use of distilled water. Distilled water is known to be free from ions that can react with the solution, thus, hindering the results.

With these 3 simple steps, farmers will be able to determine the acidity or alkalinity of their soil using only materials that are available in their homes. Easy and cheap for a better crop yield.

-end-
BEST AGRICULTURE NEWS STORY, NATIONAL
“ILOCOS DRAGON FRUIT BRINGS CURE AND INCOME TO MANY”
FREDDIE LAZARO
THE MANILA BULLETIN
The article explains how the conversion of idle lots into dragon fruit plantations has made Ilocos Norte the dragon fruit capital of the Philippines. Dragon fruit is a zero waste fruit that contains high level of anti-oxidants and Vitamin C that can help prevent the formation of cancer cells, regulate blood sugar levels and lower cholesterol.

FULL STORY
2016 ILOCOS DRAGON FRUIT BRINGS CURE AND INCOME TO MANY
“ILOCOS DRAGON FRUIT BRINGS CURE AND INCOME TO MANY”
FREDDIE LAZARO
The Manila Bulletin


BURGOS, Ilocos Norte — A decade after the Rare Eagle Forest Marine Agricultural Development (REFMAD) launched its first dragon fruit farm in Barangay Paayas, more idle lots are being converted to better use as dragon fruit plantations have sprouted. Their presence has earned for the province the accolade of being the dragon fruit capital of the Philippines.



THE BEGINNING

It was in 2005 when spouses Rodolfo and Editha Dacuycuy, REFMAD Farm owners, started to grow dragon plant in their backyard in Barangay Poblacion, Pasuquin town, purposely to produce the fruit for their daughter who is a cerebral palsy.

“We were encouraged to plant dragon cactus after a friend who brought a fruit from Macau relayed that it is good for those suffering from frequent constipation, common to cerebral palsy. Indeed it helped our daughter Kate,” she recalled.

Thinking that dragon fruit production should be enhanced for the benefit of more Filipinos especially the aged, Manang Editha started using their 1.5 hectare idle land in Barangay Paayas, in November 2006.

Having no background in agriculture being a Psychology graduate, Manang Editha sent her other daughter Mildred to Thailand to learn from international dragon fruit growers.



BUSINESS VENTURE

The high demand for dragon fruit made the family decide to expand the production. From the backyard, it was expanded to 1.5 hectares and grew to 15 hectares.

“We are happy because we did not expect this. We planted dragon fruit for our daughter until we realized that it can help the elders so we continued planting,” she said.

“Our continuing production of dragon fruit had been a calling because after I had been diagnosed with a deadly disease in 2010, the only thing I asked from the Lord was to extend my life so I can do something not just for my family but for the country,” she added.

To date, Ilocos Norte has 200 hectares of dragon fruit plantations scattered in the 21 towns and 2 cities of the province while REFMAD Farms is presently supervising more than a hundred dragon fruit growers all over the country.

Dacuycuy expressed confidence that dragon fruit production in the country would be more productive, more progressive and globally competitive.

She expressed optimism that they would soon enter the export market.

She disclosed that with the P150 a kilo of fruit, a grower can get back his investment in two years time.

“A pole of dragon cactus could bear at least 20 kilograms of fruit in a year; granting that a grower has 2,000 poles of dragon plant in a one hectare area, at least 40 tons will be harvested in a year,” she explained, adding that it takes one month from flower bud formation before a fruit could be harvested.

The peak season in the province is the months of May until September. But local researchers from the Mariano Marcos State University (MMSU) in Batac City had discovered that the use of artificial lighting ulitizing 6-watt Light Emitting Diode (LED) bulbs or 26-watt compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) helps in the degeneration allowing production on other months.



NURSERY

With the bright prospects seen in dragon fruit production, Manang Editha established a nursery to produce planting materials for those interested to enter the activity. She said REFMAD is willing to help those who want to venture.

To sustain a purely organic supply, she also went into vermiculture for a sufficient organic fertilizer.



HEALTH BENEFITS

Dragon fruit has become a favorite among the Ilocanos, even becoming part of the menu in local hotels and restaurants because of its therapeutic properties, as confirmed by health experts. The fruit contains a high level of anti-oxidants and Vitamin C that prevent formation of cancer cells, helps regulate blood sugar levels and lowers cholesterol.

Manang Editha said dragon cactus has “zero waste” as all its parts can be made eaten.

“The unopened buds is good for a delicious fresh salad; the dried flowers can be cooked into lumpiang shanghai or an ingredient for sinigang na baboy or bulalo cooked the traditional way or it can also be processed into delicious dragon balls (meatballs); the fruit skin can be cooked with malunggay leaves or can be processed into jam,” she said.

Cupcakes, ice cream, soap and even wine are other derivative products of dragon fruit.

Dacuycuy in 2011 received a Presidential Award for being the most outstanding high-value commercial crop farmer.

At present, REFMAD farm has seven permanent employees, and 15 part-time; two of whom are persons with disability (PWD).#

“Our income is enough to pay our workers and get us through the day. We are not yet exporting our products but we are really hoping that we will achieve this soon,” she concluded. #
BEST AGRICULTURE NEWS STORY, REGIONAL
“SAVING BENGUET'S VEGETABLE INDUSTRY”
KARLSTON LAPNITEN
BAGUIO CHRONICLE
Benguet, long known for being the “Salad Bowl of the Philippines” is in danger of losing that title because the local vegetable farmers have been resistant to adopting modern farming technologies and interventions. The local farmer’s heavy use of chemicals and other types of fertilizers have caused the soil to become acidic and are making it more difficult to produce good quantity yield. Through the efforts of local agencies and the learning of young Benguet farmers sent to Japan for training, the province is now hopeful that there may be solutions for the local agriculture industry.
FULL STORY
2016 BEST AGRICULTURE NEWS STORY, REGIONAL
“SAVING BENGUET'S VEGETABLE INDUSTRY”
KARLSTON LAPNITEN
Baguio Chronicle



BENGUET stands to lose its moniker as the “Salad Bowl of the Philippines” because of the same sector which has painstakingly built its reputation through the decades – the vegetable farmers.



Provincial Agriculture Office Regional Director Lolita Bentres, who has been working in government for 30 years now, said that in recent years the vegetable industry has seen a slow but noticeably decreasing trend.

Bentres on Monday pointed to the snail-paced rate of adoption of farmers to the latest farming technologies and interventions as the main factor which could spell doom for the vegetable industry.

“For years, we have not failed on reminding our farmers to step up the game, but most are stubborn and refuse to venture into innovations introduced by the government and private sector,” the provincial agriculturist lamented.

Benguet Office of the Provincial Agriculturist (OPAG) data shows that there are around 100,000 farmers and hired hands toiling the more than 27,000 hectares of agricultural land in the province.

Other institutions assisting the agricultural industry also echo the same sentiment Bentres raised .

Assistant Regional Director for Technical Service Nancy Bantog of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) on Wednesday said there are only a handful of farmers and organizations who have availed of technologies and farming implements which could potentially increase their production yield.

For years, most Benguet farmers clung on to traditional and labor-intensive manual methods passed on from one generation to another, added Training Specialist Christine Esnara of the Agricultural Training Institute (ATI) last week.

Although these accustomed way of farming has placed Benguet as the top supplier of temperate vegetables in the country, supplying over 80 percent of total demands, it is also slowly leading to the slow death for the industry.



SLOW ACIDIC DEATH

Early in 2000, Bentres said simple examination of the soil, they have discovered that almost all vegetable fields in Benguet are acidic especially in the northern towns – Atok, Bakun, Buguias, Kibungan, and Mankayan.

This finding pushed the province to establish soil and pesticide laboratories for OPAG in 2008 to prove and substantiate the reports.

Soil testing showed that most crops the OPAG experimented on were not responsive to the soil due to the high acidity level.

Bentres said the miserable condition of the soil is due to the heavy use of chemicals and fresh chicken dung manure which are high on nitrogen that acidifies the ground.

The more acidic the soil, the less it is able to produce good quantity yield which pushes farmers to increase their dosage of farm inputs for better produce. The band aid solution may increase the yield for a season but it actually increases the damage on the soil and the need for stronger synthetic inputs.

The agriculturist added the local government has long been conducting information campaigns and encouraging farmers to use soil-friendly farming inputs which have been proven to be effective and appropriate soil conservation methods.

Among these campaigns is one to convince farmers to use compost fertilizers rather than fresh chicken manure to avoid further deterioration of the soil.

“If they insist on using chicken dung which they have been used to, they must not use it fresh but rather composted first before applying,” the agriculturist adviced.

Composting entails added effort and time, but Bentres said the farmers need to sacrifice to rejuvenate the ground rather than risk permanently losing their livelihood in the coming years.

To reduce soil acidity, Bentres said they are pushing for intercropping of leguminous vegetables which could help neutralize the high nitrogen content of the soil due to their nitrogen-fixing properties.

Unlike most highland vegetables, legumes like peas, beans, and peanuts have the capacity to absorb nitrogen compounds produced by a symbiotic bacteria called rhizobia.

Although not a cure, “boosters” as are also recommended by the OPAG to resist further damages to the soil.

Introduced in Benguet in 2009, mokusaku, a Japanese technology, could have also allayed the increasing acidity of the soil if only patronized by farmers, said Bentres.

Mokusaku is a multi-functional technology which helps prevent the soil from drying as well as the unnecessary loss of fertilizer nutrients, while also serving as a repellent, herbicide, and fungicide.

Estimated to be used by not even a quarter of the farming population, the technology was developed by Masaki Yokomori, who has been helping the Benguet agricultural industry for several years.

Added to that, Bentres admitted that they cannot win the war against commercial companies who legally sell strong farm inputs that are detrimental to the soil.

“Companies are very good at promoting their products to farmers and making them very appealing, which the government is short of doing,” Bentres said.

But Benguet province is not giving up, a resolution banning all commercial companies from placing advertisement signs on farms and roadsides apart from specified posting areas is currently docked at the Sangguniang Panlalawigan.



BRIDGING THE GAP THROUGH ‘GAP’

The acidity of the soil could be a major hindrance for Benguet farmers from entering the ASEAN Free Trade Agreement (AFTA) competition since it would require farmers to have their farms certified for Good Agricultural Practices (GAP).

Department of Human Nutrition and Foods Dean Pelin Belino of Benguet State University (BSU) perceived that GAP certified produce would be the priority market because it means the product is safe and methods used are not harmful for human consumption.

Bentres said all agriculture agencies including BSU were never remiss in informing farmers of a slow death for the Benguet vegetable industry if the ASEAN market overtakes the local.

“We can inform but we cannot impose. Yet, it seems the ASEAN integration is not enough driving force to push them to comply,” Esnara stated.

Even on a regional scale, only four Benguet farms are GAP certified – two in Kibungan and two in Tublay.

Bentres said the main reason for keeping farmers from complying is their own attitude.

GAP certification requires farmers to make a detailed log book of their activities including the type and dosage of pesticides they use and frequency of spraying.

Inspectors from the DA Central Office, are also very strict in monitoring water sources as well as farm facilities such as washing area, comfort room, and even storage facilities.

Esnara said the process is really just a matter of systematizing, Many farmers however are not used to this and are reluctant to comply.

“Farmers should understand that nothing is automatic and that they should do their part too, that’s why it takes time for good things to come,” Bentres said.

For farms less than a hectare, compliance can take less than year unlike bigger farms which could longer that just one year, the provincial officer said.

To push farmers further, Esnara suggested end consumers even at the local level should patronize products from GAP certified farms.

To easily adhere with GAP, Regional Director Lorenzo Caranguian of the Department of Agriculture said mechanization will help reduce manual labor and yet increase productivity.

Admitting that Benguet terrain could make mechanization difficult and cost could be challenging, he said farmers could employ smaller machines that a farmers’ organization or cooperative can acquire.

DA and the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) can provide farmers organizations with farming machines through grants or cost-sharing.



USING JAPAN TO AVOID HARAKIRI

Benguet is now pinning its hopes of changing the traditional farming mindset on a bunch of young generation of farmers trained in Japan.

Since1997, the province has been sending in batches young farmers to different prefectures in Japan for a three-year hands-on “learning-while-earning” training where they are given accommodation and compensation.

Bentres said they have noted that trainees who return to the province have mastered and imbibed in their system the methods and technological know-how of the Japanese agricultural industry, considered to be 10 to 15 years ahead than the country.

From time to time, they are tapped by the provincial government to help other farmers with their GAP compliance. There are only roughly around 600 Japan-trained farmers as of June this year.

“We are banking on them to be the catalysts to change Benguet farming system gradually,” Bentres said.

Aside from that, Kochi prefecture, a sister province of Benguet, has been training technical resource persons through six-month scholarships on research and technology update and application.

Since 1975, there have been more than 60 people who have availed of the grant which includes Bentres and most of the OPAG staff.

Researches and methods learned from Japan are being taught to farmers who want to avail through technology demonstrations as well as Farmers’ Field School where Municipal Agriculturists educate farmers through informal schooling at the level of the municipality.

With concerted efforts from other agencies and institutions, Bentres said the province is hopeful that the vegetable industry will eventually step up and be at par with the global competition.

“We have time and again showed resilience as a people, we will thrive and survive because farming is what our people know,” she added.*
BEST AGRICULTURE FEATURE STORY, NATIONAL
“OPEN AIR MUSEUM IN IFUGAO PRESENTS CULTURE, SUSTAINS NATIVE RICE PLANTING"
RIZALDY COMANDA
THE MANILA BULLETIN
A story about the Open Air Museum at the Nagacadan Rice Terraces in Kiangan, Ifugao. The musuem has made tourism the town’s second main source of income, next to agriculture. The museum is considered a “living cultural landscape” where the local community can continue the traditional culture of growing the Tinawon rice variety.

FULL STORY
2016 Open Air Museum In Ifugao Presents Culture, Sustains Native Rice Planting
“Open Air Museum in Ifugao presents culture, sustains native rice planting”
RIZALDY COMANDA
Manila Bulletin



KIANGAN, Ifugao — There is an Open Air Museum here which presents a landscape of Ifugao culture to visitors, as well as provides a venue to sustain the traditional rice growing culture of the locals.

Opened in 2014, the Open Air Museum at the Nagacadan Rice Terraces has attracted more than the usual number of tourists in this part of the Cordillera Region, making tourism a major source of the town’s income, next to agriculture.

The Nagacadan Rice Terraces is the fifth World Heritage Site in the Cordillera Region, declared by the UNESCO in 1995 as an outstanding example of living cultural landscapes.

The transformation of this site,known as the top producer of the Tinawon rice variety, is extraordinary. In 2001, the Nagacadan Terraces was named by the UNESCO as an endangered site due to neglect. The farmers had abandoned the rice fields to migrate to the lowlands due to lack of irrigation system which made it difficult to grow the Tinawon native rice variety in the area.

In 2010, Mayor Guyguyon, then on his third term, initiated moves to “bring back the former glory of the Tinawon rice,” meeting with farmers who abandoned their ricefields and getting the cooperation of Governor Eugene Balitang and Congressman Teddy Baguilat,Jr., a native of Kiangan. All moves were aimed to revive the Nagacadan Rice Terraces which sprawls over an area of 160 hectares.

Seeing the development work on the site, the UNESCO removed the terraces from its list of endangered sites in 2012.

Now transformed, the Open Air Museum has become part of the terraces, covering areas in sitios Bilong, Pau, Bayninan, Onnop and Wingoyon. There, tourists can experience the traditional way of planting and harvesting indigenous rice for a fee of only P350 per visitor.

Today, it is considered a “living cultural landscape” where the local community can continue the growing of Tinawon rice variety. In the last harvest season, the Nagacadan Terraces produced 80,000 cavans of the native rice. This is expected to further increase with the irrigation facilities now being installed on the abandoned ricefields to encourage locals to go plant native rice again.



Oldest town

Kiangan is the oldest town in the province of Ifugao, where the Japanese Imperial Army led by General Tomoyuke Yamashita had established a base during the Second World War.

Municipal Tourism Officer Eulalie Dulnuan said that Ifugao aims to boost its tourism which iprovides an added source of income, but its primary vision is to continue the rice planting culture that connects the people to their roots.The practice is also seen as a way to support the government’s goal on rice sustainability.

The Tinawon rice is a single-crop variety which takes most of the year to grow and requires much water. The low yield has pushed the farmers to seek other livelihood opportunities in the lowlands. Records show that there are only 133 males and 99 females engaged in Tinawon rice farming.





Open Air Museums young as five

Mayor Guyguyon introduced the idea of an open air museum in 2013 to provide tourists with another way of experiencing the culture through rice planning and harvesting.

The presence of the terraces and the planting practice were combined to make the Nagacadan Terraces a tourist destination in Ifugao.

Guyguyon said that with the help of Ford Foundation and the United Nations, a fund of P1.2 million was given to Kiangan for rehabilitation and development programs for the Open Air Museum.

Since the opening of the Open Air Museum in 2014 and with the inclusion of the place in the town’s development plan, irrigation projects were also put in place, prompting farmers to return to Kiangan and plant the tinawon rice variety.

Museum Attractions

Municipal Tourism Officer Eulalie Dulnuan said that for a fee of P350 per person, tourists can enjoy an extraordinary experience at the Open Air Museum. Well- trained tour guides will lead the visitors on a three-kilometers walk over the unique landscape of Nagacadan. At the sitios, they will be met by local residents who perform cultural presentations, and invite them to native houses which now serve as galleries showing artifacts of the rich culture and traditions of the village people.

The Open Air Museum board of directors is led by Barangay Captain Jimmy Cudiangon. The villagers have been designated and have accepted the responsibility of pursuing the living museum for tourism purposes and for sustained native rice production.
BEST AGRICULTURE FEATURE STORY, REGIONAL
“LIVES AND TERRACES INTERTWINED”
MARY GRACE NIDO
PHILRICE MAGAZINE
This is the story of the Bukidnon Iraynons, a community of indigenous people from Panay Island in Western Visayas. The Iraynons have spent the past 200 years protecting the rice terraces built by their ancestors. Through the tribe’s diligence and hard work, the Antique terraces has thrived and has not only provided food for the community but also their primary source of livelihood.

FULL STORY
2016 Lives And Terraces Intertwined
“Lives and terraces intertwined ”
MARY GRACE NIDOY
PhilRice Magazine



They trek 2-4 hours on foot. The trail can either be too dusty or slippery, or both. Sweltering heat or nail-biting cold may spoil the journey.

The adults often trod the path carrying big fishes clinched to wooden rods. The youngsters traverse the route bringing goodies commonly seen in a sari-sari store. They cross rivers, slap insistent insects on their arms or cheeks, stump on big rocks, cling to vulnerable rocky walls, and climb the soaring peaks. The travel is exhausting, yet familiar, customary, and necessary.

Five mountains or 18 km after, they reach their village.

Welcome to Brgy. Gen. Fullon in San Remigio, Antique. Hidden deep in the mountains of Panay Island in Western Visayas, this village is home to a community of indigenous people (IP) called the Bukidnon Iraynons.

But why settle in an unknown place? What lies beneath their dwelling?

The whole life of the Iraynons has been witnessed by a treasure they have been protecting for the past 200 years – the 600-ha rice terraces built by their ancestors that they inherited.

A testament to their heritage, the Antique Rice Terraces were rediscovered in 2014 and had since been visited by people coming from all sectors.

Stewardship and bayanihan

Like the Ifugao Rice Terraces of the Cordillera, the Antique terraces had thrived chiefly because of the tribe’s diligence and hard work.

Midela Gomez, barangay services program officer, unveils another reason for the rice terraces’ survival as “dagyaw” - a Kinaray-a word equivalent to bayanihan. In a village where almost everyone and everything is related and connected, this characteristic is engraved in the households and in their social structure.



“Dagyaw is important since we are far from the town proper, we need to look after and help each other here,” Gomez explained.

Dagyaw was exemplified when the local government established electricity in Gen. Fullon in May this year, which switches on 6-9PM, thanks to the generator.

“Our men helped each other in carrying the electric posts from the town proper to our village,” Brgy. Captain Noli Maguad disclosed.

To the Iraynons, land is of utmost importance, according to Joyce Christine Colon of the UP Visayas Center for West Visayan Studies and National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP) Regions VI and VII consultant.

“The continued existence of these rice terraces stems from the centrality of land for IPs, land means life. Culturally, land is sacred for them because it defines their very existence. It’s not only a source of life but also a sanctuary of collective memories, reflective of their origins and history as an indigenous group,” Colon emphasized.

“The survival of the rice terraces through the years is also, I think, reflective and illustrative of the concept of stewardship among our IPs, the responsible use and protection of the natural environment through sustainable conservation and management of resources,” she added.



History and natural resources

The rice terraces, owned and shared by the tribal families in Gen. Fullon, have fed generations of Bukidnon Iraynons.

In a typical Iraynon house, stored sacks of rice are a common sight.

“We plant rice mainly for daily consumption,” Maguad said. The whole village harvests an average of 3,000 sacks (45 kg) every cropping season.

“When we harvest more than enough, we sell each sack of rice for P800,” Maguad revealed.

Like other rice fields, the Antique Rice Terraces are not spared from pests. During the rice maturity stage, birds like maya attack their crops. How do they cope? They attach colored plastics to twigs and lodge them around the fields.

“Birds are afraid of plastics so we scatter them in the field to scare them away,” Gomez said.

Fertilizers are sold by the lowlanders in San Remigio. For irrigation and domestic purposes, they have attached long pipes from the waterfalls. During harvest, threshers are transported from the town proper to their village.

In summer, the Bukidnon Iraynons plant tobacco which they sell to the lowlanders. Each bundle earns them P500-P2,000.

“Most of our buyers are fishermen as they find our tobacco cheaper than the commercial cigarettes. They enjoy it to keep them warm when they work in the sea,” Gomez said.



Developments

Aside from limited electricity, Maguad hopes that the government will create concrete pavements to make it easier for the Iraynons to travel and have easier access to rice-farming technologies.

Colon thinks that electricity and concrete pavements will also improve their accessibility to the market for their cash necessities.

While developments are part of their evolving culture, Maguad is optimistic that these will not be detrimental to their rice terraces.

“Greater interaction with the lowland and mainstream society may also mean exposure to modern lifestyles and may either enhance or pose a risk on their environment, as well as prevailing indigenous artistic, and cultural expressions in the community,” Colon explained.

“Developments are welcome as long as our environment will not be adversely affected,” Maguad said.

After all, their lives and the rice terraces are intertwined. They breathe together.
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