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2012 WINNERS

AGRICULTURE PHOTO OF THE YEAR

"STRAWBERRY FIELDS FOREVER"
RICHARD BALONGLONG
PHILIPPINE DAILY INQUIRER

TOBACCO PHOTO OF THE YEAR

"HANGING THOUGHTS"
LEONCIO BALBIN, JR.
THE CANDON TIMES

AGRICULTURE STORY OF THE YEAR
"THE CONVENT GARDENS: NUNS AS URBAN FARMERS"
BY: MARILOU GUIEB
BUSINESS MIRROR
The seven healing gardens
IN Baguio City a quick turn from a main road to a hidden alley leads one to a trellis of moonflowers crowning the arched entrance to an unexpected sanctuary of quietude and? serenity away from the blaring city sounds.

It is known as the Seven Healing Gardens of Eden.
FULL STORY
2012 AGRICULTURE STORY OF THE YEAR
"The convent gardens: Nuns as urban farmers"
By: Marilou Guleb
Business Mirror





The seven healing gardens

IN Baguio City a quick turn from a main road to a hidden alley leads one to a trellis of moonflowers crowning the arched entrance to an unexpected sanctuary of quietude and? serenity away from the blaring city sounds.

It is known as the Seven Healing Gardens of Eden. In its midst sits the St. Scholastica’s Convent, a retirement haven for Benedictine nuns. Somewhere in this garden, Sister Alice Sobrevinas is often seen picking salad greens, puttering around the plants and pulling weeds from her vegetable plots. Past her mid-70s, Sister Alice exudes youthful energy, full of enthusiasm in explaining the concept of the garden she so lovingly tends with two young helpers.

The whiff of mint scents and fennel blossoms pleasantly welcomes a visitor, where parsley, oregano, tarragon, thyme, sage, rosemary and most every herb that can grow in this climate thrive in the herbal garden. Added to dishes or made into tea, like the yacon leaves that are lush in the garden, the plants manage the blood pressure of the nuns or help them sleep well, cure coughs and wounds.

There is the vegetable garden of pechay, mustard and other vegetables planted as fancied by the gardeners, all organically nourished. The nuns also constantly enjoy bowls of salad greens straight from the garden to the dining table. To keep dementia at bay, Sister Alice keeps rows and rows of several kinds of gota kola, also known as the wild plant takip kuhol, and adds three leaves of this a day to keep the nuns’ minds perky.

Sister Alice recommends that thorny cacti be kept close to computers as they are effective radiation absorbers. Passing through a line of aloe veras, she says this variety of the ancient secret of Brazilians helps cure cancer, and gives the tip that a book by a Franciscan priest, Fr. Romano Zago, talks of the small village that is the origin of the formula from time immemorial. Seven trees of atis, jackfruit, santol, lemon, star apple, and breadfruit are enclosed in seven small circles of stone.

Her seven gardens are planted in circles within the greater circle. Sister Alice says that this is so as not to hinder the flow of energies. Energies go in circles,” she explains.

Seven healing gardens correspond to the seven chakras. They are also called rainbow gardens as the chakras respond to the seven colors of the rainbow, both with an ephemeral connection to healing. Seven is a sacred number for some religions.

The flowers of all hues in the garden is the rainbow touch here, with yellow gold marigolds and bright cosmos dominant as they serve as natural pesticides.
In the center of her garden is her pool of spirulina corresponding to the strongest chakra or the?crown of the head. Shaped like a perfect spiral, a gram of this blue-green is equivalent to 1 kilogram of fresh or natural vegetables. The spirulina tablet contains 63 vitamins.

The garden provides the healing foods of the nuns.

“We grow what we can consume and give the surplus to friends,” Sister Alice says. It’s a complete healing garden as a walk through this mandala is also a repose for the soul. But beyond this, the garden is also a concrete response of the Benedictine nuns to nurture earth.

As time tells us, our modern-day nuns have ventured out of their cloistered walls and ventured into the concerns of the world. As such, they actively get involved in activities that relate to saving the environment, which eventually made Sister Alice the president of the Baguio Vermi Growers (BVG).



Eugene, the african night crawler

While African night crawlers (ANCs) are largely used as soil fertilizers, the interest of the city stemmed from its decades-old garbage problem.

In February 2009 nine members of the Traditional Knowledge Network (TKN), sponsored by the Laguna Lake Development Authority, went to Laguna to train on various methods of waste management. The ANC excited them most as it was close to the indigenous value of “ayyew” which espouses zero waste, where every resource is used and re-used in a circle. Composting was a key practice in this value.?

In a few months, an ANC trainer was invited by the TKN. Laguna vermiculturist Michael Cagas, came with 30 bayong of ANC. A book titled Stories of Eugene, the Earthworm tells of the stories of friendship the batch of trainees have fostered with the worm and how Eugene has crawled, so to speak, into the hearts, garbage bins and gardens of the community.

The African night crawler is scientifically called Eudrilus euginae, fondly nicknamed by the BVG as “Eugene.”

Eugene, unlike our native earthworms, is flat-bellied and does not burrow underground. One kilo of worms will eat one kilo of organic waste in a day and cast this out as vermicast, rich soil fertilizer. Sister Alice used natural agriculture methods but since the training has held a fascination and love for the worms and her garden has become the training ground for rearing ANCs. For Sister Alice the ANCs are the night angels of the ground who work with no salaries.



Eugene goes to convent

Sister Guadalupe of the Good Shepherd was introduced to Eugene by the invitation of Sister Alice for the first training. She sent two of her workers and from the first six kilos that they brought home, Sister Guada says their Eugenes have grown from strength to strength. Known for many food products, the Good Shepherd Convent generates a lot of waste.Today its ANCs eat up their voluminous organic waste and give them 40 kg of vermicast every month from their many worm beds. In their grounds, there is now a covered and screened shed for their worms.

This is because ANCs can easily drown in water when it rains so homes that can drain are best, and here the rice or jute sacks, humorously called ‘sako technology,’ have been made the most popular garbage bins and home for these worms. Good Shepherd houses many student workers and vegetables raised here help to support their cause.

“We grow our vegetables and they have become very robust with our vermicompost,” she said.

They also now sell their worms per kilo, and so with vermicast and vermi-compost. They have also equipped themselves of a commercial brewer and a homemade one to make vermitea, which is great as an organic pesticide. Meanwhile, Sister Alice simply puts her worm sacks in a plastic pail to catch the liquid for her vermi-tea.

The Sta. Catalina Convent and the St. Francis Convent, among many organizations, individuals and organic farmers, nourish their gardens with compost from their ANCs.

Beddings for the worms are simple material that can maintain moisture and allow circulation of air such as banana stalks, twigs, horse manure, dry leaves, vegetable peelings or even rolled up cartons or newspaper. They can be fed with vegetable peels, food scraps, garden waste, egg shells, cardboard, paper and lots of other biodegradables. On very dry days their habitats must be watered.

Cagas reassures that there is no tendency for ANCs to become pests and, in fact they have to be protected from ants, birds, chickens, frogs, centipedes and white grubs. ANCs like to stay on the surface and such surface dwelling worms that feed on organic material are also called compost worms, with Eugene known to be the most voracious.

Beddings should not be densely packed to allow ventilation. In a week’s time the vermin bin will have eggs and baby worms.

At least every month or six weeks, the breeders are lifted on to another bed so as not to overpopulate the vermi bin. What is left also is the vermicast.

The vermicast and vermicompost can contain nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, calcium and magnesium. Per kilo of the worms can run up to P1,000 per kilo, but can easily be obtained for free from breeder friends and advocates. Vermicast can be bought for P500 per sack or P10 per kilo. One kilo of ANCs become 10 kilos in six weeks because the egg matures into a breeder in six weeks and each breeder lays more than eight eggs that becomes juveniles in as short as two weeks. Eugene may well be the best friend of hog raisers as hog manure proves to be one of the best food for them. This was proven by Bal Kiat-ong, whose pigpens he rid of foul smell with his worms. Among those who got their first two kilos of starter kits, Bal also multiplied his worms the fastest and generously gives them away in trainings.

Sister Alice and the BVG have gone on giving seminars complete with starter kits with the cry, “There’s nothing to lose but your garbage!”
(To be continued)



The Tuding nuns and their own way of farming
(Second of three parts)

THE order of sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary first based their home in Tuding, Itogon and were thereafter called the Tuding Sisters.

They were the first order of nuns who raised an organic garden and set up an organic market inviting farmers to bring their produce to the grounds of their convent.

It was Ed Guevara of the eco-village of Geo-Farms who helped the Tuding nuns set up their bio-digester tanks which filtered their waste water that they used to spray their soil for nourishment and also as a source of methane for their cooking needs.

The system no longer works but the interest in protecting the environment and planting organic vegetables the earlier nuns impressed on their congregation has evolved into simpler methods, and it works.

One rainy day, Sister Julie showed this writer her backyard garden in their Tuding convent. Dressed in red jogging pants and sneakers, she nimbly walked down the slippery stone steps down to the lower slopes of the hill within their grounds.

Despite the steady heavy downpour of several days, she had rows of robust green mustard and Chinese pechay among other leafy greens inside an improvised greenhouse made of bamboo slats and thick clear agricultural plastic sheets. Along the walk, she picked a few leaves from aragula plants lining the pathway. Here and there she would bend to gather some fallen passion fruits on the ground or pluck the ripe ones from the trellis. They were all the produce of her own labor.

“What we cannot consume here I bring to the organic store our nuns run at the Cathedral,” she said.

The interest of the Tuding nuns for organically grown products have led them to many a seminar and workshops to learn the secrets of healthy happy agriculture and such knowledge derived from these they gladly share in training other women.

Stacked on Sister Julie’s table are her training materials from lectures given by organic farmer masters or awardees of? Gawad Magsasaka.

She tells of the first exposure she had with? Magsasakang Siyentista for Natural Farming Eric Tinoyan of Tuba, an engineer who wrote on producing indigenous microorganism. The process involves the storing of a kilo of cooked rice in a bamboo hollow, cooled before covering. The container is placed in a forest area where there is white hyphae, a cotton-like white fungal growth.

Made simpler, one can just place the container in a clean area, such as by a bamboo grove. After three or five days, white mold can be seen on the rice. The rice with the microbes can be transferred into a clay jar and mixed with one kilo of crude sugar. The mixture is then let to stand for seven days, covered with paper, in a cool place. The juice taken from here if mixed with one liter of water can be sprayed on plants or mixed with biodegradables to hasten composting, which can be ready in as short as two weeks. Sister Julie also learned about fermented plant juice microorganisms from Tinoyan. Interestingly, the oriental herbal nutrient uses ginger, beer, gin and crude sugar, and some laughingly joke that this must produce tipsy crops unless the farmer gets to the ingredients first.

Tinoyan encourages the use of indigenous or easily available material and cites quite a number. One of the easiest to obtain is the rice bran to produce lactic acid bacterial serum. The formula requires 1.5 liter first rice wash which carries a lot of good microorganism. This is let to stand for seven days by which time the bran floats. The rice bran is strained and only the Lacto Seed (LAS) water is used. Added to the jar are 10 liters of fresh milk, then it is covered with manila paper tied with string. After seven days the fat (white solids) floats to the top and a yellowish substance stays in the bottom which is the Lacto Seed without fat. A total of 10 kilos of crude sugar must be added so it does not spoil and after seven days of storage, the formula can be used much the same way for hastening composting.

Sister Julie had tried several of the procedures, displaying some of them stored in jars. But one of her constant formulas is the one she learned from another Gawad Magsasaka awardee for organic farming, Pat Acosta. After years of experimentation, Acosta discovered that all it takes is understanding how nature works and adding a bit of technology to speed up the natural process.

Acosta’s simple formula takes just one tablespoon of clean soil, one tablespoon of sugar or molasses and the mixture is cultured for seven days. Twenty-five milliliters of the culture is mixed to a liter of water and sprayed for composting plant cuttings. The mixture can rot one ton of biodegradables like garden debris in about two weeks. Acosta cautions that the compost heap must be covered as rain washes away the nutrients.

Molasses, or crude sugar, contains calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, phosphate and sodium and thus increases the population of good microorganisms in the soil mixture.

Almost shyly, Sister Julie adds her own concocted formula to the line of jars on the table and says this is liquid taken from sunflower extract. Following the formula of Tinoyan and Acosta, Sister Julie heaps up cuttings of sunflower bushes, leaves, stem and all, and puts them in a container. She collects the juice from the rotting heap and applies the same formula she learned from Acosta.

For the Tuding nuns, what can be more indigenous and available than sunflowers From November to February, the hills of this region are swathed with a golden carpet of sunflower blooms. For the rest of the year, they are considered as nuisance bushes by city dwellers.

But farmers know better. According to anthropologist and former director of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture Joachim Voss, sunflowers were used by the Mayans and were first introduced here as ornamentals. Mountain farmers in this region put cut sunflowers in irrigation canals so that the nutrients flow directly to the fields. Sunflowers are one of the richest sources of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium among the plants found in the region.
The Tuding nuns also run a farm in Tublay managed only by two nuns and in Tuba by one nun. Their produce is brought to their Mt. Grown Natural Foods store situated at the exit point of the Baguio Cathedral. Organic farmers who used to bring their goods to the Tuding convent now sell their produce here.
(To be concluded)



Conclussion

Urban gardening has time and again been a program of the city. But nothing has been more sustained than the gardens run by the nuns here. Even while these gardens that produce healthy food adhere to their spiritual commitments of integrity of creation for the Good Shepherd Nuns or caring for mother earth for the Benedictines and the Tuding nuns, their practice sets the premise for the city that urban gardening can be done with discipline and incentives given the community.

Urban gardens are in fact a part of eco-city designs. This is premised on factors like the need to minimize transportation costs of bringing farm goods from rural settings to city markets. There is also the need to have green patches within city spaces to minimize the heat-island effect a city with many concrete structures are beset with.

The School of Urban and Regional Planning (SURP) of the University of the Philippines recommends a mix of rural and urban spaces in cities. Half of the world’s population live in urban areas and the growing sprawl poses a great deal of challenge to sustainability of resources.

In Baguio for instance, a great population is comprised of migrants from the interiors of the region. They come from agricultural areas and rather than add to the burden of feeding, Geraldine Cacho, head of Ornus, an urban poor organization believes that their rural values can serve as assets to the city. Like growing their own food in pots or otherwise throw away containers.

Mountain folk here have the value of ‘ayyew’ or reusing every resource and many of the rural poor trained at the St.Scholastica’s Convent have adapted the vermiculture kind of agriculture and growing their own food that are healthy and pesticide free. It is also a practice akin to ‘ayyew’.

The fragile nuns actively pursuing organic gardening here are able to manage their gardens with the minimum of extra help because of easier technologies. All it took for them to get going was an interest and commitment to go into healthier lifestyles.

According to Dr.Jose Balaoing, director of Cordillera Agriculture Development Center and project leader of the Organic Demo Farm of Benguet State University, there are enough resources for training those interested. There simply is just a need for sustained and organized efforts to keep the interest of city dwellers in producing their own backyard gardens.

For one, awareness of the benefits of home gardening can be emphasized such as residents can be more ensured of the cleanliness of what they eat. With the worsening economy, raising one’s own food needs will help family budgets.

While the number of organic gardeners are growing in the city, the practitioners noticeably have in common a higher level of awareness and inclination for healthier lifestyles. Fast foods and ready-to-cook meals are symptoms of fast-paced living in urban areas and most city dwellers have fallen into this routine without much thought. Studies show this has has a toll on health.

UP-SURP recommends revisiting or returning to the past, such as architecture that provide for roof gardens or container gardening.

Dr. Steffen Lehmann, UNESCO Chair in Sustainable Urban Development for Asia and the Pacific, captures the value of the endeavors of the nuns to bring about a new and healthier lifestyle for the community. He says, “A sustainable city makes provision for adequate food production, a return to the community and gardens of past days, where roof gardens become an urban market garden. It is essential that we bridge the urban-rural disconnect and move cities towards models that deal in natural eco-systems and healthy food systems. Local food and short supply chain save on transport cost and includes eating local and slow food initiatives
TOBACCO STORY OF THE YEAR
"FROM SUNSET TO SUNRISE"
BY: MAURICIO VICTA
SUN STAR BAGUIO
More than a decade ago, local tobacco farmers were producing the salty and off-type variety of tobacco which most cigarette manufacturers started rejecting in 2003. By that time, local tobacco farming was already being dubbed as a "sunset industry," with production levels reaching its lowest from 2004 to 2006.
FULL STORY
2012 TOBACCO STORY OF THE YEAR
"From sunset to sunrise"
By: Mauricio Victa
Sun Star Baguio



More than a decade ago, local tobacco farmers were producing the salty and off-type variety of tobacco which most cigarette manufacturers started rejecting in 2003. By that time, local tobacco farming was already being dubbed as a "sunset industry," with production levels reaching its lowest from 2004 to 2006.
This was in stark contrast to the glory years of the tobacco industry in the 1990s when the Philippines was a major exporter of Burley and Virginia tobacco.
"We have reversed the trend of deteriorating quality and accelerated the pace of quality improvement," said Winston Uy.

From producing salty, low-grade rejects, Filipino tobacco farmers now grow world-class tobacco that command high farm-gate prices in the local market. For instance, Universal Leaf Philippines Inc.'s Isabela burley used for domestic manufacturing and for export, is now renowned worldwide, according to Uy.
"As of 2011, unmanufactured tobacco exports reached 40 million kilos or more than 50 percent, Uy said in painting a vibrant picture for the future of the local tobacco industry.

A significant boost to the industry is the continued confidence of the stakeholders that things will turn better.

In 2000, Philip Morris International invested $300 million in the Philippines to build a state-of-the-art cigarette manufacturing facility in Tanauan City, Batangas. It was the single biggest investment made by the company in the Asia-Pacific Region at a time when other foreign investors opted to either bring their businesses elsewhere or put off their expansion plans in the Philippines.

"We had faith in the Philippine economy," Philip Morris Fortune Tobacco Corp. President Chris Nelson said. "Despite the lack of investor confidence at that time, we believed in the country. We invested our money. We invested it on the tobacco farmers. We invested it in our product."

The company established training schools for the farmers to make them competitive in Tuba, Benguet and in Luna, Isabela. Philip Morris Philippines Manufacturing Inc.'s agronomy experts taught and continue to teach local farmers in these schools the proper way of growing tobacco and how they can improve quality and optimize production.

The National Tobacco Administration (NTA) and another major player in the industry, Universal Leaf Philippines Inc. (ULPI) with PMPMI, teamed up in implementing the Market-Driven Quality Tobacco Production Program. This initiative, which is done via the Tobacco Contract Growing System, provides local farmers a ready market for their produce, along with the necessary technology and assistance in terms of production inputs like seedlings and fertilizers; modern post-harvest facilities; market access; and even incentives for compliance with good agricultural practices, exceeding production quotas, among others.

In return, tobacco buyer firms were assured of the volume and quality of the tobacco they needed for the local and export markets.

As a result of these mutually beneficial initiatives, the tobacco industry started to rebound in 2007 and continued its steady growth at an average of 17.5 percent, according to government data provided by the NTA. From 2006, when production was recorded at its lowest level at 36.5 million kilos, this figure jumped to 79.33 million kilos in 2011, where the biggest annual growth was derived from burley and native tobacco, at 23 percent and 30 percent, respectively. The production of the Isabela burley, now globally considered to be one of the best types of tobacco for manufacturing cigarettes, increased from more than 7 million kilos to 19.4 million kilos, during the same period, according to NTA data.

"We are very optimistic with the good tobacco quality we get from our hardworking farmer-partners. At the start of every crop year, we provide them full financial and technical support. I believe that supporting our farmers 100 percent creates sustainability," ULPI president Winston Uy said.

ULPI is the biggest tobacco-growing and processing company in the country. It contracts more than 28,000 farmers planting an area of more than 19,000 hectares. The ULPI farmers produce 60 percent of total local leaf.

NTA data show that there were 10 companies/wholesale tobacco dealers competing in the purchase of the leaf through 50 trading centers. The biggest among them is ULPI, which purchased 47.59 million kilos (or 60 percent of the 79.33M total production for 2011). PMFTC is the second largest tobacco buying company, purchasing 14.81 million kilos ( or 18.67 percent); followed by TransManila Inc. (TMI) with 4.85 million kilos (6.11 percent); Isabela Leaf Tobacco Co. with 4.17 million kilos (5.26 percent); Continental Leaf at 3.52 million kilos (4.44 percent); and Companade Filipinas (CdF) at 2.24 million kilos (2.28 percent).

The other wholesale tobacco dealers include the Associated Anglo-American Corporation, La Reyna, Tabaquiera, and Mighty Corporation.

"We contract farmers directly in Mindoro while the rest of our local leaf requirements come from tobacco leaf suppliers. Our farmers receive regular on-site support from our leaf technicians, who visit them weekly and provide them with agronomy training," Nelson said.

Through the Tobacco Contract Growing System, PMFTC directly contracts 3,000 farmers and provide them with steady employment. PMFTC gives them not only on-site assistance but provides them with interest-free loans as well.

Far from being a sunset industry as claimed by some quarters, production increased from 73.76 million kilos in 2010, valued at P4.84 billion, to 79.09 million kilos as of October 2011, with a value of P5.26 billion, NTA data show.

Today, there are now 2.9 million from 2.7 million in 2009 Filipinos who are either employed or dependent on tobacco growing and manufacturing as well as in tobacco wholesale and retail trading.

Tobacco growing has proven to be highly profitable for farmers employed in this industry, compared to those planting other crops like palay, corn or tomato.
BEST AGRICULTURE TV PROGRAM/SEGMENT
"GOAT RAISING"
BY: INEZ MAGBUAL
MAUNLAD NA AGRIKULTURA (TV5)
WORKING SCRIPT- BAGONG MAUNLAD NA AGRIKULTURA- Episode

EPISODE: GOAT RAISING Producer: Inez Magbual

==================================================================
1. OPENING SPIEL/HOST ON CAM(PLS. CHOOSE ESTABLISHING LOCATION FOR BICOL/DIFFERENT FROM VEGETABLE EPISODE)-RECORDED
FULL STORY
2012 BEST AGRICULTURE TV PROGRAM/SEGMENT
"Goat Raising"
By: Inez Magbual
Maunlad na Agrikultura (TV5)



WORKING SCRIPT- BAGONG MAUNLAD NA AGRIKULTURA- Episode

EPISODE: GOAT RAISING
Producer: Inez Magbual

=======================================================================================

1. OPENING SPIEL/HOST ON CAM(PLS. CHOOSE ESTABLISHING LOCATION FOR BICOL/DIFFERENT FROM VEGETABLE EPISODE)-RECORDED

2. EPISODE LINE-UP

Sa susunod na kalahating oras…

…ang balitang pang-agrikultura para sa linggong ito…

…ang kalagayan ng pagkakambingan sa Naga…

at…isang pagsaksi sa mataas na uring pag-aalaga ng kambing sa Naga City.

3. OPENING BILLBOARD (OBB)

4. INTRO BALITANG PANG-AGRIKULTURA/HOST ON CAM===RECORDED

5. BALITANG PANG-AGRIKULTURA/VO HOST

ONE ITEM: GRAFIX- MINI-HYDROELECTRIC POWER PLANT, SISIMULAN NA

Kasunduan para sa mini-hydroelectric plant, nilagdaan!

Ang kasunduan ay ginawa sa pagitan ng National Irrigation Administration, Department of Energy at Japan International Cooperation Agency,o JICA.

Ang proyekto ay para sa sistema sa patubig ng Pilipinas.

Ayon kay NIA Administrator Antonio Nangel, malaki ang maiiambag ng proyekto laban sa krisis sa enerhiya ng bansa, lalo na sa ilang bahagi ng Mindanao .

Ayon kay Nangel, sinimulan na ng JICA ang feasibility study para sa proyekto, at matapos ang anim na buwan ay isusumite ang resulta nito sa DOE at NIA.

Ipapa-alam rin ng JICA kung magkano ang gagastusin sa pagpapatayo ng mga mini-hudroelectric power plant.

Sinabi ni Nangel na ang unang makikinabang sa mini-hydroelectric power plant ay ang mga irrigation systems sa San Mateo, Isabela at sa lalawigan ng Ifugao.

Aniya, bukod sa makatitipid ang gobyerno sa pagpapatayo ng mga planta sa tulong ng mga pribadong kumpanya, kikita pa ang bansa sa kuryenteng malilikha ng planta.

END AGRI-NEWS

6. EXTRO NEWS/INTRO GAP/HOST ON CAM===???

Susunod…ang mapagmahal na pag-aaruga sa kambing ng isang goat raiser sa Naga City….sa pagbabalik ng BAGONG MAUNLAD NA AGRIKULTURA.

7. BUMPER/TEASER: TRIVIA- Karamihan sa mga taong allergic sa gatas ng baka ay maaring gumamit ng gatas ng kambing at mga produkto mula dito. - http://www.foodreference.com



Gap 1

8. BUMPER/TEASER

9. INTRO SUCCESS STORY/HOST ON CAM (RECORDED)

3535 SI DR. RUFO LLORIN…UPANG MAISULONG ANG KALUSUGAN NG KANYANG KAPWA. 3549

10. SUCCESS STORY/VO HOST/Dr. Rufo Llorin Jr

VOICE OVER

Higit sa pera o problema, pagmamahal ang nananaig sa Naga City Goat Farm, na pag-aari at pinamamahalaan ng mag-asawang Llorin.

Ang mga kambing dito ay tinatratong parang tao…hinihimas…binibigyan ng pansing higit sa ibinibigay sa karaniwang alagang hayop. (VIDEO OF
DR. LLORIN/CARETAKER TOUCHING THE GOATS/GOAT ASKING TO BE CARESSED/PAUSE)

UPSOUND DR. RUFO LLORIN JR., NAGA CITY GOAT FARM

3954 WE TREAT THEM AS LIVING CREATURES…BE TREATED EQUALLY AS HUMANS. 4001…CARETAKERS NMIN…IT’S A NO-NO FOR THEM NA …PANGALAGAAN…TAMANG PAG-AALAGA. 4018

VOICE OVER

Bawa’t isa ay may pangalan.

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

4718 PAG WALA AKONG HOSPITAL WORK…I STAY HERE THE WHOLE DAY. 4724…KINIKILALA NAMIN ANG BAWA’T ISANG KAMBING. 4727

CUT TO

0403 WE HAVE TO GIVE NAMES…FOR EACH ANIMAL THAT WE HAVE KASI…AMERICAN GOAT ASSOCIATION. 0413 …SO THEY CAN TRACK DOWN THE PROGENY…ACTIVITY FOR EACH GOAT. 0419

SFX TRANSITION TO DR. LLORIN WITH CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRY

1429 THIS ONE IS THE CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRY…TO THE ADGA. 1436…ANCESTRY…YUNG LOLO AT LOLA, BOTH SIDES. 1450

CUT TO

1508 IF YOU WANT TO PROPAGATE…AND CONTINUE BREEDING ON THAT LINE. 1515

VOICE OVER

Bawa’t kambing ay natutunton ni Dr. Llorin ang lahi at pinagmulan.

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

2835 WE HAVE A SO-CALLED PLANNED BREEDING PROGRAM. 2837 (VIDEO OF WHITEBOARD/PAUSE)

CUT TO

2846 YOU CAN NOW DETECT… THE PERCENTAGE OF BLOOD DUN SA MGA ANCESTORS NIYA. 2854 HALIMBAWA YUNG ANCESTORS NITO…THIS ONE IS PLAYBOY…ONE YR OLD BUCK…TATAY NIYA….SA NUBIANS…IS THE VERY FAMOUS…AND LUCKILY I WAS ABLE TO GET ONE OF HIS KIDS. 2920

VOICE OVER

Ang pagkakambingan na nagsimula bilang isang libangan ay sineryoso ni Dr. Llorin, isang internist.

Dahil likas umano siyang magsasaka at mahilig sa hayop, hindi naging problema para sa kanya ang akuin ang apat na kambing na ipinasa sa kanya ng isang pasyente.

Dahil dito, napakinabangan niya ang labinlimang ektaryang lupaing pag-aari ng pamilya, na tatlong dekadang nakatiwangwang lamang.

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

3723 YUNG GINAMIT NAMING PAMAMARAAN NOON…YUNG GOAT NAKA-RAISE…FAMILY
OWNED NA LUPA…FORMERLY A RICEFIELD, THEN NAGING IDLE…GOAT FARM NA…MAY PARK DIYAN SA KABILA YUNG SA SISTER KO. 3743

VOICE OVER

Iniwasan ng butihing manggagamot na pag-usapan ang laki ng kanyang ipinuhunan sa kambingan.

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

3759 IF YOU HAVE TO BECOME A COMMERCIAL RAISER…IT DOESN’T MATTER SIGURO YUNG FINANCIAL. 3802 …WHAT MATTERS IS YOUR PASSION KASI ANG PASSION MAHIRAP BILHIN E. 3809

CUT TO

3818 IT REALLY NEEDS YOUR TIME…AND YOUR LOVE FOR THEM. 3822

VOICE OVER

Ang mga problemang kanyang kinaharap dahil dito ay hindi niya itinuring na problema.

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

3851 WE DON’T TALK ABOUT THE PROBLEMS…WE TALK ABOUT WHAT WE CAN DO AFTER. 3857

CUT TO

3916 YUNG MGA BASIC NA PROBLEMA GAYA NG NAGKAKASAKIT ANG KAMBING PARANG TAO DIN…I DON’T COUNT THIS AS A PROBLEM ACTUALLY, 3924

VOICE OVER

Para sa butihing doktor, wala sa isip nila ng kanyang maybahay na pagkakitaan ang pagkakambing.

Para sa kanila, naging importante ang mapakain nang wasto at husto ang kanilang mga alaga.

UPSOUND ROGER OLLETE, Caretaker. Naga City Goat Farm

3117 ANG UMAGA PO…PAKAIN MUNA NG KAMBING…MAGBIBIGAY NG TUBIG…SAKA PO FEEDS. 3125…SA HAPON, GRASS PO BINIBIGAY NAMIN. 3135 (VIDEO OF PLANTS FOR FEEDING)

CUT TO

3149 YUNG INDIGO PO PAG ALAS-TRES…5:30 PO ANG PAGMI-MILK NAMIN. 3154 (VIDEO OF INDIGO)

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

2347 THIS ONE IS WHAT WE CALL MINERAL BLOCK…MINERAL LICK…OF ELECTROLYTES…SALT…CALCIUM…AND OTHER NUTRIENTS…SO ALL THE REST NA HINDI KAYANG IBIGAY NG GRASS…NABIBIGAY NITO. 2413

VOICE OVER

Higit sa kanilang kikitain, umiral sa puso at isip ng mag-asawang Llorin ang makapagproduce ng pagkaing malaki ang magagawa para sa kalusugan ng kapwa tao…pagkaing manggagaling sa mataas na uring kambing at sa gatas nito.

Ang karne at gatas ng kambing ay natagpuang higit na mabuti para sa katawan ng tao.

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

4226 PAG NAGKATAY KAYO NG KAMBING…YOU CANNOT SEE ANY FAT CONTENT WITHIN THE MUSCLES. 4231

CUT TO

4237 KUNG MERON MAN DOON…POLYUNSATURATED…MONO-UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS….WHICH IS THE GOOD FAT. 4247

CUT TO

4257 PAGDATING NAMAN DITO SA GOAT MILK, WE FOUND OUT NA ALAM NA NG MGA IBANG TAO…THEY CAN SAY…MAS MARAMI ANG TAO SA MUNDO NA UMIINOM NG GOAT MILK. 4312

CUT TO

4318 WHY BECAUSE OF THEIR NUTRITION. 4318

VOICE OVER

Dahil sa mga katangiang pangkalusugan ng gatas ng kambing, may mga karamdaman ang tao na maaring maiwasan kapag ininom ito.

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

4830 SA DIABETES IT LOWERS DOWN YOUR SUGAR. 4832

CUT TO

5156 BECAUSE ALL RUMINANTS …GRASS FED…LINOLEIC ACID. 5201 …LOWERS DOWN YOUR BLOOD SUGAR. 5206

CUT TO

4923 THIS IS THE ONLY MILK THAT CAN BE TAKEN BY HYPER-ACIDIC AND PATIENTS WITH ULCERS. 4928

CUT TO

5024 THIS KIND OF MILK HAS A CALMING EFFECT…NAGPAPAKALMA. 5027

CUT TO

5119 PLUS THIS ONE HAS AN ANTI-PLATELET ACTIVITY…NAGPO-FORM NG CLOT…BECAUSE ASPIRIN HAS AN ANTIPLATELET ACTIVITY. 5137

VOICE OVER

Lahat ng alagang kambing ni Dr. Llorin ay gatasan.

At maging sa gawaing ito…sinisiguro ng mag-asawa na maingat at hinay-hinay lang ang galaw.

UPSOUND MRS. LLORIN

0727 LALAGYAN NATIN NG PAGKAIN...FEEDER…HINDI SIYA MAGWALA…PAG NAGSTART NA SIYA MAGGAGATAS…AND THEN…IDI-DISINFECT ANG TITS NIYA. 0741 …THAT IS BETADINE. 0749 (PAUSE FOR VIDEO)

CUT TO

0757 YUNG FIRST FEW DROPS…KINUKUHA NATIN IYAN…YUNG DUMI…SO WE JUST SQUEEZE IT. 0808 (PAUSE FOR VIDEO UNTIL GETTING A PLASTIC CONTAINER FULL)

CUT TO

0848 AND THEN YOU SMELL IT…KUNG MAY MGA ODOR NA HINDI MAGANDA…HINDI MO IYAN ISASAMA. 0853 (PAUSE FOR VIDEO)

VOICE OVER

Sinubukan naming mag-gatas ng kambing…at bagama’t nag-aalangan kami noong una, nakaraos din kami. (PAUSE FOR VIDEO OF NINA MILKING/SUSTAIN)

Tinikman namin ang ipinagmamalaking sariwang gatas ng kambing…at hindi kami nabigo sa linamnam nito.

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

4347 MAYBE IT’S BECAUSE WE TREAT OUR GOATS WELL…AND THEY GIVE US THE BEST TASTING MILK. 4352

VOICE OVER

Natuklasan naming ang gatas ng kambing sa Naga City Goat Farm ay naipoproseso na rin sa keso at sa sabon.

UPSOUND MRS. LLORIN

3356 IT’S PASTEURIZED NATURAL WAY OF …AND THE SAME WAY WITH THE SOAP…IT’S HANDMADE. 3406 …OLD TRADITION…PAGGAWA NAMIN NG MGA PRODUKTO.3414 …WALA NAMANG HANDMADE NA PERFECT. 3420

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

5237 PLANO NAMIN SIGURO IS TO HAVE A MORE MODERN…PROCESSING PLANT FOR OUR MILK…MAIN PLAN…REMAIN AS IT IS…DEALING WITH 80-100 GOATS, WELL-LOVED. 5304

VOICE OVER

Samantala…ang mga kambing sa Naga City Goat Farm ay hindi lamang maaasahan sa kanilang masustansyang gatas.

Maging ang kanilang dumi ay pinakikinabangan.

Bawa’t sako ng purong dumi ng kambing ay naibebenta sa halagang P500 bawa’t kilo.

Ang duming ginamit sa produksyon ng vermicast sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakain nito sa mga bulateng night crawlers ay nabibili naman sa presyong P1000 kada kilo. (PAUSE FOR VIDEO)

Walang dudang karapat-dapat mahalin ang mga kambing na may superyor na lahi at matatagpuan sa goat farm ng mga Llorin.

Hindi lamang materyal na pakinabang ang nakukuha sa mga ito…kundi ang magandang pakiramdam na naibibigay nito sa mga nagmamahal sa kanila.

UPSOUND DR. LLORIN

5425 KUNG KAYO E MARAMING PROBLEMA…THINK OF YOUR GOATS…YOUR PASSION…EVERYTHING WILL BE RESOLVED. 5430

END SUCCESS STORY

10A. EXTRO SUCCESS STORY (RECORDED)

5436 SA LARANGAN MAN PAGGAGAMOT O GOAT RAISING KUMPYANSA…MAGBABALIK PA RIN PO ANG BAGONG MAUNLAD NA AGRIKULTURA. 5449

14. BUMPER/TEASER: TRIVIA- Ang gatas ng kambing ay nagtataglay ng mas mataas na antas ng calcium, vitamin A at niacin, kumpara sa gatas ng baka. - http://tribes.tribe.net/



Gap 2

15. BUMPER/TEASER

17. INTRO MAIN INTERVIEW/VTR/HOST ON CAM

OPEN WITH

5500 KAPILING PO NATIN…DIRECTOR JOSE DAYAO…REGION V…KABABAYAN …OPO. 5511

CUT TO

5519 GAANO PO BA KALAWAK…DITO PO SA REGION 5…SIGURO TITINGNAN NATIN MAYBE MGA 4 YRS AGO…WALANG ENTHUSIASM…NAGKAROON NG ENTHUSIASM…UNTI-UNTI LUMALAKI. 5536

CUT TO

5550 OF COURSE NOON MEDYO FRAGMENTED SILA…SO WITH THE ADVOCACY…INUMPISAHAN WITH DR. LLORIN…NAKAPAG-ORGANIZE NA TAYO NG GOAT RAISERS ASSOCIATION DITO. 5600

CUT TO

5606 AND THEN SA IBANG PROVINCE MERON NA RIN…LALO SA MASBATE MERON NA RIN…IMPORTANCE NG GOAT RAISING. 5615

CUT TO

5713 ANO PO BANG NALALAMAN NYO NA …COMMON PONG PROBLEMA…ANG ISANG PROBLEMA…WE STILL HAVE TO IMPROVE THE BREED PARA MAKAPAG-MAXIMIZE…IN TERMS OF MILK AND MEAT ANO? THEN IKALAWA…BECAUSE OF THE CLIMATE…MAY MGA KONTING PROBLEMA TAYO SA HEALTH ANO? …NA HOPEFULLY NAA-ADDRESS NATIN…TENDER LOVING CARE…(NINA) ME
SHELTER…BIBIGYAN MO RIN NG PROPER NUTRITION…OO (NINA). 5757

CUT TO

5802 ISA PA RIN IS YUNG SA MARKETING. …MGA BICOLANO…HINDI KUMAKAIN NG GOAT…FOOD CHAINS…NAGI-SPECIALIZE NG GOAT. 5817

CUT TO

5831 WE STILL HAVE TO IMPROVE THE ROADMAP…DIRECTION NATIN SA GOAT INDUSTRY….WE ARE WORKING ON THAT. 5837

CUT TO

5839 KANINA PO SABI NI DR.LLORIN…ANO PO BA ANG ASSISTANCE ANG NAIBIBIGAY…INTERVENTIONS SA ATING MGA GOAT RAISERS? 5851 …ADVOCACY…IKALAWA…DITO KAY DR. LLORIN…PL480 …IMPORTED GOAT…STOCKS NILA…NAKAPAGDEPLOY TAYO NG IMPORTED BUCK…14 IMPORTED DOES. 5925 AND THEN ANG NDA NAGBIGAY DIN. 5927 …SI DR. LLORIN NAKAPAG-INITIAL PAYMENT NA NG STOCKS. 5952…THROUGH THEIR NETWORK. 10000…ALL THE WAY TO…PINAPADALA NATIN…CAMALIG…PARA EKSAMININ. 10036

CUT TO

0133 ANO NAMAN PO YUNG ESTADO…O STATUS…LOCAL PROCESSORS…NG GOAT MILK …MERONG ILAN-ILAN NA …PERO HINDI KATULAD NITONG KE DR. LLORIN. 0147 …THIS WILL SERVE AS A MODULE NA MAKIKITA NATIN NA …KAHALAGAHAN NG MAGANDANG PAGPROSESO. 0156

CUT TO

0317 MARAMING SALAMAT PO SA INYO…PARA PA RIN PO SA BAGONG MAUNLAD NA AGRIKULTURA. 0328

END MAIN INTERVIEW

18. SEGUE TO EXTRO SPIEL/HOST ON CAM===RECORDED

19. CLOSING BILLBOARD (CBB)/END
BEST AGRICULTURE NEWS STORY (NATIONAL)
"LT NOTES LOW STRAWBERRY PRODUCTION DUE TO CLIMATE CHANGE"
BY: LIZA T. AGOOT
BUSINESS MIRROR
LA TRINIDAD, Benguet The production of strawberry is down by about four tons compared to the annual average production recorded by the municipality of La Trinidad.

La Trinidad municipal agriculture officer (MAO) Fely Ticbaan said that the records show that for the months of November to February 2012, which are peak months of strawberry production, an average harvest of 16 to 18 tons was harvested, compared to the previous years' harvest of 21 tons.
FULL STORY
2012 BEST AGRICULTURE NEWS STORY - NATIONAL
"LT notes low strawberry production due to climate change"
By: Liza T. Agoot
Business Mirror



LA TRINIDAD, Benguet The production of strawberry is down by about four tons compared to the annual average production recorded by the municipality of La Trinidad.

La Trinidad municipal agriculture officer (MAO) Fely Ticbaan said that the records show that for the months of November to February 2012, which are peak months of strawberry production, an average harvest of 16 to 18 tons was harvested, compared to the previous years' harvest of 21 tons.

She said that when there are rains, which are unpredictable at this time due to climate change, the flowers that become berries fall off, preventing more fruits from being produced.

She said that farmers are doing some remedial measures to prevent the further impact to strawberry production by installing tunnels or low improvised green houses to protect the plants from destruction in case there are rains.

This is apart from the fact that the area being used in growing strawberries is only 66 hectares compared to the 300 hectare area utilized for cutflower and vegetable production in the municipality.

She added that land conversion is another issue to contend with, which is reason why a research is being completed which hopes to confirm the result of an study that allows strawberry to be grown in sloping areas, not just in flat lands. The swamp area, she said is frequently affected by flooding which also affects the production.

Ticbaan added that the tissue cultured or clean runners are continuously being produced and distributed to the farmers, which they use in replacing old plants to allow it to produce more berries.

She added that new varieties are contiuously being imported from other countries to find new and better planting materials.

At present, there are three varieties being produced. They are the sweet charly variery which is favorite among the farmers due to the good color and the sweetness. The festival variety is an alternative which is good for travel due to the harder flesh which could withstand the impact of travel. While it is hard, the color is dark, which the farmers do not like very much.

The camasora is another variety which is however not frequently planted.

Organic strawberries are also now being produced, where a number of planting materials are made available.

Mike Bagtila, president of the strawberry producers association said that the rain is the major enemy of strawberry and climate change has greatly affected their produce.

He revealed that the Department of Agriculture, the MAO and the provincial government are exerting extra effort to help the farmers and maintain production despite the changes in the environment which is a great actor in strawberry production.

He revealed that with the help of the Japan Agri Exchange Council (JAEC), an all season strawberry is presently being developed, which variety could produce fruits all year round. This is a diversion from the usual when strawberries are produced only during the cold months of the year and very few during the other months of the year.

Mayor Greg Abalos also said that they are looking at coming up with a comprehensive study that would give special attention to the improvement of the strawberry production of the municipality, which he added records a dwindling production rate.

Abalos explained that the strawberry festival, which has made a name for the municipality where La Trinidad earned the Guinness title of having the biggest strawberry shortcake in the world is a reason to continue doing innovations and improvements for the production of strawberries, with La Trinidad having to produce the product being its trademark in the world aside from being the vegetable bowl and the rose garden of the country.
BEST AGRICULTURE NEWS STORY (REGIONAL)
"VEGGIE FARMS DESTROY HECTARES OF MOSSY FOREST IN MOUNT DATA"
BY: HARLEY PALANCHAO
BAGUIO MIDLAND COURIER
BAUKO, Mountain Province – Against possible threats, members of an indigenous peoples group have shut down a private road leading to a commercial farm that encroached on four hectares of the Mt. Data National Park mossy forest.

"Enough is enough," said former Mountain Province governor Sario Malinias, chair of the Kabatangan Ancestral Domain Indigenous Peoples Organization (Kadipo).
FULL STORY
2012 BEST AGRICULTURE NEWS STORY - REGIONAL
"Veggie farms destroy hectares of mossy forest in Mount Data"
By: Harley Palanchao
Baguio Midland Courier



BAUKO, Mountain Province – Against possible threats, members of an indigenous peoples group have shut down a private road leading to a commercial farm that encroached on four hectares of the Mt. Data National Park mossy forest.

"Enough is enough," said former Mountain Province governor Sario Malinias, chair of the Kabatangan Ancestral Domain Indigenous Peoples Organization (Kadipo). Kadipo was awarded an ancestral domain title in 2009 covering an area of 9,476.53 hectares.

The ancestral domain title covers the threatened mossy forest located in Monamon Sur, Bauko.

Together with Kadipo members, Malinias on Tuesday escorted journalists who covered the supposed indiscriminate cutting of trees in a mossy forest of Mt. Data.

The cutting of trees is reportedly for the expansion of commercial farms from the Benguet side.

Prior to the inspection, Kadipo members blocked the private road which is used as access road by the unscrupulous farmers.

Monamon Sur Punong Barangay Mario Daganos was called in to witness the closure of the access road.

Kadipo members informed journalists that a ranking official of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources discouraged them from blocking the road because they might be sued in court.

Undaunted, Kadipo members reached an agreement and shut it down, saying it is the most practical way to stop the further encroachment of the critical mossy forest.

The DENR-CAR was informed about the encroachment. On July 5, the Kadipo wrote and asked Regional Executive Director Clarence Baguilat to take the lead role in preserving Mt. Data.

DENR was also informed Kadipo members planted a thousand trees within the two hectares of the threatened four hectares in 2008.

These trees were uprooted by unscrupulous people who even used a bulldozer to expand their commercial vegetable farms right into the mossy forest section of Mt. Data.

"To our dismay, some unscrupulous people have reentered the area just recently, uprooted the young trees, cultivated a hectare of mossy forest, and prepared the land for farming and are about to plant cabbages when discovered by the indigenous peoples," reads the letter of Kadipo to Baguilat.

For years now, attempts were made asking the DENR to disestablish Mt. Data as a national park because of the expansion of commercial farms in decades but such move is opposed by some quarters because it will endanger Mt. Data and will result to an environmental disaster.

A study conducted by Dr. Lawrence Heaney of the Field Museum of Natural History based in Chicago, Illinois and Filipino biologist Danilo Balete based in Los Baños, Laguna, revealed deforestation and commercial farming in Mt. Data aggravated the extinction of indigenous mammals.

The study warned of an environmental disaster to happen in Mt. Data within the next 10 years if nothing is done to address these concerns.

"Most of the vegetable farms on Mt. Data are found on the slopes that usually range from 15 to 45 degrees, with some as steep as 60 degrees. The soil is loose and powdery and easily subject to high rates of erosion."

Previously, some areas of Mt. Data have been fenced in a bid to protect the main sources of water and major tributaries of the Abra, Agno, and Chico rivers. While fencing was deemed an effective measure, the expansion of commercial vegetable farms proved to be overwhelming.

The same study revealed at least seven out of the 15 native mammals that once lived in Mt. Data have become extinct between 1895 and 1946 but extinction has continued up to the present.

Four species of native mammals found only in Mt. Data have gone extinct, according to the study.

Mt. Data hosted a joint expedition from the Philippine National Museum, the Field Museum of Natural History, and the US Army Medical Research Unit in 1946.

The expedition aimed to determine what specific mammals that caused the deaths of many US soldiers, who died of diseases carried by rat parasites during World War II.
BEST AGRICULTURE FEATURE STORY (NATIONAL)
"WEATHER-PROOF FISH CAGES SEEN AS SAVIOR OF AQUACULTURE INDUSTRY"
BY: GABRIEL CARDINOZA
PHILIPPINE DAILY INQUIRER: NORTHERN LUZON
ROSARIO, La Union—Marine biologist Al Sobrejuanite was not a bit worried about the fish cages he is tending off the coast of Rosario town in La Union, when Typhoons “Pedring” and “Quiel” left the country through the Lingayen Gulf in September and October.
FULL STORY
2012 BEST AGRICULTURE FEATURE STORY - NATIONAL
"Weather-proof fish cages seen as savior of aquaculture industry"
By: Gabriel Cardinoza
Philippine Daily Inquirer



ROSARIO, La Union—Marine biologist Al Sobrejuanite was not a bit worried about the fish cages he is tending off the coast of Rosario town in La Union, when Typhoons "Pedring" and "Quiel" left the country through the Lingayen Gulf in September and October.

Like in the past, he was confident that the 20 cages stocked with a variety of high-value fish would not be crushed by huge waves that the successive typhoons induced as they plowed through the gulf.

"Ours are rope-framed cages. They are weather-proof," Sobrejuanite says.

Again, he was proven right. Not one of the cages was damaged. All 20 were intact and millions of pesos worth of high-value fish saved.

Sobrejuanite's company, Tiger Property Developers' Group Inc. (Tiger), is the first to adopt the rope-framed cage technology on a large commercial scale after the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) regional office in San Fernando City in La Union developed and introduced it in 2009.

The cages occupy a portion of a 10-hectare mariculture park about a kilometer from the shoreline of Barangay Bani in Rosario. The company grows "pompano" (silver pomfret), "siganid," snapper, sea bass and "bangus" (milkfish).

"We are new in the fish cage industry at that time and we did not quite know how to go about it. So we sought the help of the BFAR," Sobrejuanite says. "When the BFAR told us about the rope-framed cage, we immediately fabricated and used it."

Today, Tiger is the leading pompano distributor in northern Luzon, regularly supplying popular restaurants in the area and Metro Manila. It's also fabricating rope-framed fish cages, selling them to fish cage operators who have begun to shift to the new technology.

BFAR first tested the rope-framed fish cage in 2008 when its prototype was completed after a year of study.

"We first deployed it in the waters off Badoc, Ilocos Norte, because the underwater current there is strongest. Then we tried it in Rosario, La Union, where the waves are biggest," says the bureau's regional director, Nestor Domenden, who led the development of the fish cage.

"These are extreme [water] conditions and the cages have withstood all these," he says.

The rope-framed fish cage technology, Domenden recalls, was born out of the need to find solutions to the recurrent and devastating fishkills in many fishery areas of the country.

Fishkills occur, he says, because fishing structures have crowded the sheltered mariculture areas, such as rivers, lakes and coves.

"These structures were built too close to one another, preventing the water to refresh naturally, producing water pollutants in the process," Domenden says. The only solution, he says, was to disperse the fishing structures.

"But the question was: Where do we go?" he says. There's only the open sea or the exposed areas left for them. The sheltered areas are already saturated.
"And this was how the idea began to take shape. We thought that maybe, there is a kind of material that can be used for fish cages that is flexible enough to withstand the destructive forces of the sea," he says.

At that time, the most popular fish cage was the Norwegian-type, which uses a circular frame made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or steel pipes. Around this frame, which is held by floaters and anchors, a net cage 7 to 10 meters deep is hung and stocks are released and raised inside it.

"We just simply changed the frame of the cage, from PVC or steel pipes, to rope, and hung the same net cage," he says. "We have thought of the rope because we believed it was flexible enough."

He was right. When Typhoon "Juan" ripped through Pangasinan last year and Typhoons "Juaning," "Mina," Pedring and Quiel battered Pangasinan and La Union this year, the rope-framed fish cages were intact.

In contrast, Domenden says, a fish cage operator in neighboring Sto. Tomas town in La Union, using the Norwegian-type steel frame, had all his cages crushed by the typhoons, losing the stocks to the sea. "This proves that the design, especially the use of the rope, is very appropriate for semi-exposed or exposed areas," he says.

Aside from its durability, Domenden says, it's a lot cheaper to build the rope-framed cage because it is simpler. What makes the Norwegian-type frame expensive, he says, is its use of steel or PVC pipes. A rope-framed cage costs half its price.

From their experience with Tiger, Domenden says the rope-framed fish cage has been refined to near-perfection. "We now have better design, better material and it's now more economical to fabricate it," he says.

In fact, he says, many industry players have asked him for the details on the design. Fish cage operators in Eastern Visayas have adopted the technology, he says.

Sobrejuanite says at least two big fish cage operators have ordered rope-framed cages from his company. BFAR has applied for patent of the technology and it is awaiting approval.

"On our part, it's just okay for the private sector to adopt this. They can have it for economic intention as long as they will recognize the source of the technology. We're [a] government [office] anyway," Domenden says.

There's one thing though that he wants to see in the future: Deep-sea mariculture farming using the rope-framed fish cage technology.

"I know it won't be easy and it will be a bit challenging [for industry players], but it's very promising," he says
BEST AGRICULTURE FEATURE STORY (REGIONAL)
"OASIS…A FARMER’S RESPONSE TOWARDS FOOD SECURITY"
BY: XENIA SOCORRO B. JAMERO
For some reason, water comes to mind when I see or hear the word oasis. It connotes life, something that refreshes and keeps one active. In reality, oasis is actually a fertile or green area in a desert; a haven or sanctuary where one can take refuge or escape from something.

For Japok, it’s where he gets his daily supply of food to survive.
FULL STORY
2012 BEST AGRICULTURE FEATURE STORY - REGIONAL
"OASIS...A Farmer's Response Towards Food Security"
By: Xenia Socorro B. Jamero
Katuwang - The Official Magazine of the National Irigation Administration Region 6



For some reason, water comes to mind when I see or hear the word oasis. It connotes life, something that refreshes and keeps one active. In reality, oasis is actually a fertile or green area in a desert; a haven or sanctuary where one can take refuge or escape from something.

For Japok, it's where he gets his daily supply of food to survive.

Japok, whose real name is Franz Jason Baltazar, is a young farmer-entrepreneur in Brgy. Cabuluan, Oton, Iloilo and the incumbent president of MACABITU Irrigators' Association. He's a mechanical engineering graduate and has worked for a private mobile phone service contractor for a few years. When his contract ended, he decided to venture into agriculture because of one simple reason. "Nahadlok ko magutom, amo na nanguma ako (I was afraid to go hungry, so I decided to farm)", he said.

He named his two-hectare land OASIS, an acronym which stands for Organic and Sustainable Intercrop System. The OASIS grows about everything that you would need on top of your table: rice, fish, fruits, vegetables and a wide variety of meat.

There are pigs, at least 38 of them, a hundred chickens and 300 chicks, several ducks, four goats and a cow. As you roam around the area, you can hear a mix of squealing as the pigs demand for food, the quack-quacks of the ducks and the endless excited chuckles of the chickens. The goats say meh-meh once in a while, maybe just to let you know that they are somewhere there. It was the music of life.

Japok started his farm empty-handed, equipped only with a will to survive. He did not know anything about agriculture so the farm became his own school. "Three years nga eskuela ko sa farming, sa tawo, te three years man nga pamirde ko eh, isipon mo na lang nga tuition (fee) (I studied farming for three years from other people, so I was not gaining profit for three years. Think of it as payment for tuition)", he said.

Japok had no money when he started, so he depended on his uncle for capital and guidance. Indi ka magsalig sa ginapamunitan ko (don't depend on what I have fished)", his uncle told him.Tuon ka man pamunit (learn to fish)", he added.

And so Japok learned. He learned not to make money but ideas. ""Ang kuarta madula, but ang idea indi (Money will disappear, but ideas won't)", he said.

His farm grew as his ideas expanded. His first project was the tropical koi fish. Later, he ventured into tilapia breeding, mainly to keep the koi in good condition. The tilapia cleans the wounds of the koi, I learned. Later he grew pigs and expanded koi breeding utilizing the waste from the pig pens to the ponds.

It sounds toxic, but Japok explained that the kangkong and water lily in the ponds filter the toxins, so in the end, the residue can be eaten by the fishes.

I was learning bits of practical science as I talked to him.

It took a great amount of discipline to grow the OASIS. Japok recalls not eating chicken for three years until it grew into a large flock. He started from five hens and a rooster, which he bought from his neighbour to keep them from eating his rice plantation. Now, he supplies about 50-100 chickens each month for the Breakthrough Restaurant, a popular restaurant serving seafood and native dishes in Arevalo, Iloilo City.

The OASIS is an efficient system of integrated farming. The pigs are fed not only with grower feeds but with chicken meat from Japok's own flock. Same goes with the catfish, though they are fed with grower floaters a month before harvest. The chickens feed directly from the miniature rice paddy built straight out from the pigpens. It is covered with protecting nets to secure the chickens inside. There are also pepper plants everywhere, for the chickens to peck on when they are sick. It takes very minimal cost growing everything in the OASIS. Japok believes in "being productive without expenses", he said.

There are also vermicomposts everywhere: at the corners of the ponds, under the banana and papaya plants, inside the pigpens and even beneath the ground of the goats' small house. Vermicomposts are excellent organic fertilizer and soil conditioner.

Japok started OASIS with the sole reason of protecting himself from hunger. But now, he has more than enough to keep his stomach full. He manages to pay his bills from the sale of his bananas, buy clothing and personal stuff from his hogs and poultry, and travel using the income from the fishes. He once used a bike to go in and out his farm, but now, he is a proud owner of several vehicles to help him become more efficient and productive.

Without any background in accounting, he innovated his own system, the "calendar method" where he records all transactions and income in a calendar. Later, the Department of Agriculture encouraged him to use proper bookkeeping.

He earns more than enough from his poultry, hogs and fish production, yet, like a true and wise farmer, he will not give up on rice production. He needs it for consumption, he says.
As much as he has learned from other people, Japok is also willing to share his technology to others. Being the president of the MACABITU IA, he now encourages his members to go into integrated farming.

"Slice ka gamay nga portion para sa integrated (farming). Ngaa mahadlok ka bi mag slice sang isa ka portion sa uma mo nga butangan mo sang lalaswahon mo, poultry mo? Ti subong ginahimo na nila (You slice a small portion from your land for integrated farming. Why would you be afraid to slice a portion of your land to dedicate it for your vegetables and poultry? So now they are doing it already)", he explains.

Japok and his members plan to build a "bagsakan area" where they can gather all their products from rice, poultry and vegetables. Japok had volunteered to help market their products to encourage them on the project. As of now, about four members have started to replicate what Japok had started.

The OASIS grew without any financial assistance from institutions or agencies. Its roots stemmed from a farmer's desire to avoid getting hungry; discipline and patience made it grow into a successful means to combat poverty and hunger not only for Japok, but slowly, for the community surrounding him. It is living proof that a cheap yet sustainable, organic solution can be made feasible, contrary to the general belief that it takes a huge amount of capital for one to get started and rise above poverty.

As it happened for Japok, may the OASIS expand to serve as a model sanctuary of food sufficiency to others.
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